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Black Swan


USA Director: Darren Aronofsky Executive Producer: Jennifer Roth Producer: Arnold Messer


Screenwriters: Mark Heyman, Andres Heinz, John McLaughlin Cinematographer: Matthew Libatique Editor: Andrew Weisblum


Cast: Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Winona Ryder, Barbara Hershey, Vincent Cassel


2010/color/103 min.


DARREN ARONOFSKY A native of Brooklyn, New York, Darren Aronofsky began his filmmaking career while studying at Harvard University. His first feature, Pi (1998), enjoyed critical success and established Aronofsky as a bright new face in independent film. His bold and gritty style has continued to earn him acclaim as well as industry clout.


Filmography The Wrestler (2008) The Fountain (2006) Requiem for a Dream (2000) Pi (1998)


Followed by the Last Reel Party at the Denver Dry Building


Presented by


In cooperation with Colorado Ballet, E-3 Events Special thanks to Fox Searchlight


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The obsessive world of classical ballet clearly holds as much allure for filmmaker Darren Aronofsky as have the professional wrestling ring (The Wrestler, SDFF31) and the terrors of drug addiction (Requiem for a Dream, SDFF23)—and in this dark psychological drama he exploits all of its possibili- ties, onstage and backstage. Calling up allusions to everything from The Red Shoes to All About Eve to The Phantom of the Opera, Aronofsky once more weaves a compelling web of manipulation, madness and disorder.


As the artistic director of a major New York dance company, cunning Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel) has his hands full: after firing his temperamental prima ballerina (Winona Ryder), he decides to create a radical new production of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, focusing on the duality of the Swan Queen—the fresh innocence of the White Swan and the sensuality of the Black Swan. Enter two competing dancers hellbent on filling the starring role—the driven but protected Nina (Natalie Portman), for whom ballet is the entire world, and the alluring Lily (Mila Kunis), who gives off all the heat Nina lacks. For Aronofsky, their rivalry constitutes a perfect opportunity to blur the distinctions between fantasy and reality: as they develop a strange bond, running amok with drugs and sex, Nina undergoes a frightening transformation.


Barbara Hershey costars as Nina’s demanding backstage mother; the impres- sive choreography comes courtesy of New York Ballet star Benjamin Millepied; and Tchaikovsky’s timeless music haunts, enhancing the surreal, nearly para- noid tone the film takes on as the night of the fateful premiere approaches.


—BILL GALLO Sponsored by


CLOSING NIGHT AT THE ELLIE


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