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La Collectionneuse


FR A NCE Director: Eric Rohmer Producers: Georges De Beauregard, Barbet Schroeder


Screenwriters: Patrick Bauchau, Haydee Politoff, Daniel Pommereulle, Eric Rohmer Cinematographer: Nestor Almendros Editor: Jacquie Raynal


Cast: Patrick Bauchau, Haydee Politoff, Daniel Pommereulle, Alain Jouffroy 1967/color/85 min.


The fourth film in late French auteur Eric Rohmer’s iconic series Six Moral Tales focuses on a delectable young seductress in a bikini and her two male friends: a pompous antiques dealer and a feckless artist who stubbornly determine that this hyperactive but aloof Lolita will not be adding them to her collection of summer conquests. Bonne chance, boys: the hapless rebels are soon caught up in a complex, often comic, typically Rohmeresque web of sexual intrigue.


No less than its more famous stablemates My Night at Maud’s and Claire’s Knee, La Collectionneuse demon- strates just what a surgically precise analyst of evolving French manners its creator had become by the mid-1960s, when it was released. Rohmer got some help, though: in a typical act of New Wave generosity, the director invited the principals in his youthful cast to collaborate with him on the highly improvisational screenplay.


Sumptuously shot in glamorous St. Tropez by the legendary cinematographer Nestor Almendros, this was Rohmer’s first color outing and, in some people’s eyes, his best. Certainly it captures the era’s spirit of swinging sexuality and its politics of personal liberation.


—BILL GALLO Sponsored by


M*A*S*H


USA Director: Robert Altman Producers: Ingo Preminger, Leon Ericksen (associate) Screenwriter: Ring Lardner Jr. Cinematographer: Harold E. Stine Editor: Danford B. Greene


Cast: Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall 1970/color/116 min.


Call M*A*S*H a product of guerrilla filmmaking, and you won’t be far off the mark. In 1969, while the bean-counters and green-lighters at 20th Century Fox had their collective attention focused on two big-budget World War II epics—Patton and Tora! Tora Tora!—Robert Altman, a TV-trained director with only two feature films to his credit, began shooting a far differ- ent war-themed project on a Fox backlot.


Working on his shoestring budget with a cast of relative unknowns, Altman conducted the production in an audaciously free-form style, encouraging enough improvisation to actually worry some of his more experienced actors—top-billed Elliott Gould and Donald Sutherland both admit they tried to get their director fired—and deliberately allowing visual and verbal anachronisms in his search for something more important than historical accuracy. The result was a bold and bracing black comedy about Army surgeons who crack wise and flout author- ity to maintain their sanity near the frontline, nominally that of the Korean War. At a time when most mainstream Hollywood movies avoided specific references to the then-waging Vietnam War, Altman dared to make a supposed period film that looked and sounded as topical as the morning news.


Much to the grateful surprise of everyone involved—including the director—audiences in 1970 easily recognized and eagerly embraced what M*A*S*H was really all about. And today—four decades and a few wars later—Altman’s maverick masterwork


remains as relevant and as seriously funny as ever. —JOE LEYDON, VARIETY


Following the screening, Elliott Gould will be presented with the 2010 John Cassavetes Award and will be inter- viewed from the stage by Variety film critic Joe Leydon.


In cooperation with Alliance Française de Denver In cooperation with Single Volunteers of Greater Denver 181


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