This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
No Woman No Cry


USA Director: Christy Turlington Burns


Producers: Dallas Brennan Rexer, Christy Turlington Burns Cinematographer: Kristen Johnson Editor: Sari Gilman 2010/color/60 min.


CHRISTY TURLINGTON BURNS


Gracing magazine covers from Vogue to Time, Christy Turlington Burns has been at the forefront of the fashion industry for more than 25 years. But philanthropy has also long been a part of Turlington’s career, from her public support of efforts to rebuild postwar El Salvador in the early 1990s to her launch of the award-winning website Smoking Is Ugly after losing her father to lung cancer. Currently, Turlington is pursuing a master’s degree in public health from Columbia University. She lives in New York with her husband, filmmaker Edward Burns, and their two children.


Pregnancy is a death sentence for more than half a million women every year—but their deaths would be preventable if they could obtain the health care they needed. This documentary focuses on the personal stories behind those statistics.


The product of a five-year outreach campaign called Every Mother Counts, No Woman No Cry follows the stories of at-risk pregnant women in a remote area of Tanzania, a slum in Bangladesh, a postabortion care ward in Guatemala and a prenatal clinic in the United States. It had its genesis in the birth complications of former supermodel Christy Turlington Burns, who became an activist after she survived a postbirth hemorrhage and learned that many women in the world do not have the kinds of services that would save their lives in such an event. In 2005, while pregnant with her second child, Burns traveled with representatives of the humanitarian organization CARE to El Salvador, her own mother’s native country, where she met young mothers whose access to clean water, never mind basic prenatal services, was limited. Later, she visited Peru to learn about a project that has reduced maternal mortality by 50 percent in five years. Burns also shares the stories of a young Maasai mother in labor who must walk five miles to the nearest clinic; a Bangladeshi woman too ashamed to seek prenatal care; and a Guatemalan woman recovering from a dangerous illegal abortion.


Now a maternal advocate for CARE, Burns is studying for her master’s degree in public health administration at Columbia University. She is the wife of film- maker Ed Burns, whose film Nice Guy Johnny is also screening at SDFF33.


—VAL MOSES Sponsored by


114


DOCUMENTARY


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211