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Little Rose (Rózyczka)


POL AND Director: Jan Kidawa-Blonski Producer: Wlodzimierz Niderhaus


Screenwriters: Maciej Kapinski, Jan Kidawa-Blonski Cinematographer: Piotr Wojtowicz Editor: Cezary Grzesiuk


Cast: Andrzej Seweryn, Robert Wieckiewicz, Magdalena Boczarska


2010/color/118 min.


JAN KIDAWA-BLONSKI Born in 1953, Jan Kidawa-Blonski stud- ied architecture at Silesian Polytechnic in Gliwice and direction at the state film school in Lodz. From 1982 to 1991, he worked with the Silesia, Oko and Zodiak film studios. From 1997 to 2001, he was a member of the board of directors of the Association of Independent Film & TV Producers.


Selected Filmography Destined for Blues (2005) The Last Blues (2001) Encounters, Partings (1999) Dairy in a Marble (1992)


Based on the autobiography of renowned Polish author Pawel Jasienica, Little Rose tells the story of a writer’s betrayal at the hands of a beautiful young informant, recruited by her lover in the secret service to prove his rival is a Jew.


Cowriter/director Jan Kidawa-Blonski’s historical drama is set in 1968, when the Polish government launched an anti-Semitic campaign in the wake of Israel’s triumph over Egypt in the Six-Day War. The agent, Roman, masquerading as a member of the foreign trade mission, romances the young Kamila, a typist at the university where the writer, Adam, teaches. When Roman is pressured to bring down the teacher-suspect, he in turn bullies Kamila (code name: Little Rose) into taking Adam as a lover. In order to please the brutish man she thinks she loves, she does his bidding. Indeed, she initially enjoys playing such an important role—but little by little, she discovers that she is merely a tool being wielded for political purposes. As her loyalties waver, the surveillance operation becomes a dangerous love triangle.


Archival footage from the time period serves to underscore how the human spirit can be crushed at the kitchen table as surely as on the streets. Under a totalitarian regime, Kidawa-Blonski suggests, passion is risky: clouding the thinking, it leaves those who surrender to it open to destruction.


—VAL MOSES In cooperation with Denver Jewish Film Festival


100


CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA


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