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of LED manufacturers entering onto the market, making overstated claims about what their products can achieve in terms of performance. ‘Navigating through all the hype and manufacturers' claims can be a difficult and daunting task so lighting designers need to apply caution,’ notes Barratt. ‘Making an informed decision about an LED system is unlike any other lighting specification. Comparing fluorescent or HID products is easier because there are long established industry standards to turn to but that’s not the case with LEDs.’


Barratt says its crucial that lighting designers have full confidence in the products they specify. That’s why GE Lighting is working to define a universal set of performance measures designed to put comparison claims on equal footing and allow lighting designers to compare LED products like-for-like. ‘Not only are we bringing new robust LED technologies to market but we are


actively working alongside independent bodies to develop measurement, efficiency and performance guidelines that add clarity not confusion to the specification process.’ Light+Building saw Philips broaden its portfolio of LED-based lighting solutions, which enhance the lives of people at home and in cities. Items included a 12W LED lamp as a substitute for a 60W lamp, and LivingAmbiance – a revolutionary approach to mood creation, wirelessly integrating multiple luminaires and lamps in one system for the home.


The 12W LED lamp is set to be launched anytime now. The dimmable lamp will deliver 806 lumens of warm white light. For businesses such as hotels, replacing high concentrations of 60W lamps with Philips’ LED replacements will potentially help them save up to 80 per cent of the energy used by older technologies. Andrew Howis, design associate at Speirs and Major Associates, recognises that LEDs have come a long way in the last few years. ‘It’s less than a decade since the use of LEDs was limited to direct view applications such as marker lighting. The emergence of the power LED as a source has allowed LEDs to enter the lighting mainstream gradually, initially through effects lighting (such as RGB colour change) and small-scale accent lighting.’ Howis says the last year or so has seen LEDs begin to make the final big step: into downlighting, wall washing and spotlighting in interiors and into floodlighting and street lighting outdoors, with credible first generation products beginning to appear in the


Part of Light Bureau’s scheme for the reception space at 95 Gresham Street includes an LED feature wall.


‘In a nutshell LEDs are good for some applications but not for everything.’


Paul Nulty, design director at Light Bureau www.a1lightingmagazine.com 19


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