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In control


The updated Part L Building Regulations will come into play in October 2010, and are though to be the toughest yet. They form part of the Government’s plan for lowering carbon emissions, but the regulations have been met with a somewhat mixed reception. The new guidelines call for three in every four interior light fittings to be low energy, instead of the previous one in four. Part L 2006 called for 40 lumens per circuit watt or better, whilst Part L 2010 requires a new efficiency threshold of 45 lumens per circuit watt. Exterior fittings will be limited to 100 lamp watts, down from 150 lamp watts under the current requirements. The 2010 legislation relaxes the need for all fittings


to be dedicated. This means people will be free to switch over to any light source after the building is finished. The legislation is based on total load, and doesn’t recognise the potential to reduce consumption by dimming or turning off luminaires when they aren’t needed. ‘With lighting accounting for up to 33 per cent of total electricity consumption in commercial buildings, it is self evident that it should be one of the first functions to be targeted by companies looking to drastically reduce energy consumption within a commercial building,’ says Diederik de Stoppelaar, vice president of Sales Europe and Africa at Lutron. Total light management solutions are already available, such as Lutron’s


Quantum system, which provides an opportunity for facilities managers and building owners to reduce both energy consumption and operating costs. He says a major trend that will impact the lighting market is the increasing march of LEDs combined with light control technologies. ‘We are finally starting to see some standardisation in the way LED drivers work and alongside this, improvements in the design and implementation of LEDs in light fittings. Although it has been sometime in coming, LED technology is definitely coming of age and its impact will be felt in small and large residential and commercial installations alike. In addition, the increasing trend for lighting


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