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Ten Years After


In one decade, the technology and marketing of the gaming industry has advanced exponentially


ByRoger Gros and Frank Legato Pat Sajak and Vanna White appeared at the IGT booth at G2E 2002 for the debut of the video Wheel of Fortune slot machine. X 52 | G2E Preview 2010


industry,” G2E promised to bring together the top technology providers along with the experts who would teach attendees—the operators of casinos around the world—how to utilize that technology for greater operational and market- ing efficiencies. Indeed, 10 years later, few would recognize


the industry because of the changes that have occurred on the casino floor, both from a tech- nology side and from a more sophisticated and knowledgeable approach on the marketing end that has been augmented by technology.


When the first Global Gaming Expo debuted in 2001, there was a hope and expectation that the trade show and conference would break new ground in the technology and marketing areas. After all,with the slogan “by the industry, for the


Marketing Matters Even 10 years ago, a debate raged about how casinos could best attract—and retain—cus- tomers. The old-timers insisted that the meth- ods they had developed in the early days of casi- no gaming were still the best: allow casino hosts to identify players, to get to know them, to reward them for their play and to follow up with them once they leave to assure that they would


return again and again. That worked fine when the pool of casino


players was relatively finite and little outreach was done by the individual casinos to identify and cap- ture new players. But once mass marketing began to kick in during the 1980s and ’90s, it quickly became apparent that there needed to be an alter- native way to service the increasing number of players who were arriving at the casinos’doorsteps. The big breakthrough in the past 10 years


has been the introduction of CRM—customer relationship management.This business strategy was in use for several years before being discov- ered by the gaming industry. Initially, it was used by companies selling products to identify cus- tomers and streamline the sales process by pro- viding those customers with the products they


EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is an excerpt from a White Paper issued by the American Gaming Association that tracks the changes in marketing and technology in the gaming industry over the last 10 years. To access a copy of the White Paper, visit www.americangaming.org.


Top 5 Technology and Marketing Initiatives at G2E


• Impact of 9/11 at the top of the list for gaming executives


• Review of report from National Gambling Impact Study Commission continues


• Entry-level sessions offered for new participants in gaming industry


• Association of Gaming Equipment Manufacturers (AGEM) partners with G2E


• “Wheel” slot machines dominate exhibit floor


2001


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