This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
72 Yorkshire Museum


LIGHT AT THE MUSEUM


Boasting a treasure-trove of historical artifacts and natural wonders, the newly re-opened Yorkshire Museum offers a captivating insight into our region’s past. Catherine De Soza went along for a history lesson with a difference. Photography: Gareth Buddo


And it is the exhibits themselves that reign supreme.


There’s the fine, Gothic, Middleham Jewel; a marble sculpture of the Roman Emperor Constantine; a thousand-year-old Viking sword; a meteorite that landed in Middlesbrough during the Victorian era; and the skeleton of an Ichthyosaur – a huge prehistoric sea dinosaur discovered off the Yorkshire coast. Then there’s the rare skeleton of a Moa – a huge,


flightless bird native to New Zealand and long extinct. The Moa takes pride of place on a large, raised plinth, dominating its room in the natural history section. Head Curator Andrew Morrison is certainly taken


with it. “The Moa is my personal favourite,” he said. “An eight-


foot tall bird? It’s just a brilliant thing. You can imagine it bolting around in its heyday. “It was discovered by Yorkshire scientists in the 19th century, and Yorkshire was at the cutting edge of


I


t’s not everyday that you come face-to-face with an eight-foot tall bird, a gigantic sea monster and a


Roman God in the centre of York. But pay a visit to the recently re-opened Yorkshire


Museum and you’ll find all manner of weird and wonderful things inside. Ancient artifacts, jewels, carvings, skeletons, statues, pots and weapons: together they tell a tale of Yorkshire’s past that is frequently surprising and utterly compelling. Nestling in the heart of York’s beautiful, serene


Museum Gardens, the museum was originally built in 1830 and looks nothing short of stunning following an extensive £2 million refurbishment. The building’s interior has enjoyed a badly needed make-over, with gloomy brown Hessian usurped by bright white walls and colourful features. The blocked-up windows of old have been freed up to allow the light in, showing off the exhibits at their best.


“THE WHOLE MOVEMENT OF DARWINIAN THOUGHT BEGAN IN YORKSHIRE.





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com