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6. Ed Miliband 1. Nick Clegg


Power-broker, King-maker and Deputy Prime Minister in the first coalition government since the Second World War, the Liberal Democrat Leader and Sheffield MP has enjoyed a meteoric rise and now holds the balance of power in the UK parliament. As Minister for Constitutional and Political Reform, he is also set to oversee potentially radical and far-reaching electoral and parlia- mentary reforms.


2. Jessica Ennis Having recently claimed European Heptathlon gold to add to her world title from last year, Sheffield star Jessica is perhaps Britain’s most successful and popular athlete of the moment. With two years to go until the 2012 Olympic Games, her achievements are an inspiration to both aspiring young sport stars and the nation as a whole.


It was always his brother Dave who seemed set for the Labour leadership, but a late surge in Trade Union support and strong polling in second-prefer- ences suggests Miliband the younger could become the surprise Leader of the Opposition instead. Even if that should not come to pass, the Don- caster MP’s rapid rise to prominence and influential work on energy and climate change make him an under- stated force in British politics.


7. Alan Bennett


One of the UK’s most renowned playwrights and a literary great, Bennett’s work continues to delight


and provoke thought the world over. Following the huge international impact of The History Boys several


years ago, his long-overlooked 1980 play Enjoy has seen a phenomenal


revival culminating in a nationwide tour this year – where it has enjoyed rave


reviews and stunned audiences with its uncomfortable mix of laugh-out-


loud humour and a haunting vision of a forgotten working class.


3. William Hague


Tony Blair may have got the better of him ten years ago, but the Richmond MP and Conservative heavyweight bounced back to become Foreign


Secretary in 2010. As such he is now a key player in international affairs,


representing Britain’s interests abroad and mustering a considerable impact on world politics.


8. Sebastian Coe As the man who brought the Olympics to Britain and the Chairman of the event’s organising committee, Sheffield-born Lord Coe is the figurehead of the biggest sporting occasion ever to be hosted in this country and has a key part to play in the event’s planning, impact and eventual legacy – whatever that may be.


9. Dame Judi Dench


4. David Hockney One of the most influential artists of modern times, the Bradford boy turned enfant terrible of the art world continues to be a groundbreaking visionary and outspoken cultural commentator at the grand old age of 73. Having embraced new technology, he is also showing bright young things how it’s done in the 21st century. An exhibition of new work, created using his beloved iPad, will be displayed in Paris later this year.


5. Corinne Bailey Rae


Her second album has been a huge critical and commercial success on both sides of the Atlantic, and with a Mercury Prize nomination also under


her belt, the Leeds soul singer continues to exert a strong influence on British and international pop music.


Widely considered to be Britain’s greatest living actress, the veteran York thesp has notched up so many


top TV and film roles over the years, her consistent excellence is never in


doubt. In 2010 she has already picked up an Emmy nomination for her work in Cranford, enchanted theatre-


goers on her return to the stage in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and


dazzled in an unprecedented Proms appearance at The Royal Albert Hall.


10. Dorothy Thompson The Chief Executive of one of Britain’s largest companies, Drax Group plc head honcho Dorothy Thompson cuts an inspiring figure: a businesswoman who has made it to the very top of the corporate ladder while attaining the respect of employees, shareholders and government ministers. With Drax supplying 7% of the UK’s electrical power, Thompson’s views and decisions have a considerable bearing on both the current and future issues surrounding energy production and consumption.


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