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Bruce Munro Private pool house, South Somerset


Bruce Munro gives his designer touch to a South Somerset pool house.


With several art installations on the slate, as well as large scale corporate or hospitality projects, lighting designer Bruce Munro relishes the chance to make lights for private residential properties once in a while. Such a project is the pool-house,


newly built at the bottom of a garden in a beautiful village in South Somerset. The brief was to create a party house for the owners and their two children – both under 10. From the start, disco balls were on their wish list. Munro and Anna Craddock (who led the project) began by lighting the glitter balls with clusters of three colour-changing spotlights. A feature light was created by


adapting Munro’s Random Drop chandelier to fit the large space. ‘The French windows are really big, and we needed something that wouldn’t tangle up with the first gust of wind. We used tear-drop diffusers instead of clear glass balls which might easily smash,’


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explains Craddock. The teardrops look like water droplets, in keeping with the water theme. It’s a grown-up fibre optic piece, with


350 clear diffusers at the ends of fibres that measure 1m at their longest. A special ceiling plinth measuring 2.6m x 1.2m supports the weight. The white light travelling down the fibres and refracting from the drops is projected from one 100W halogen lamp, and the projector is set in a remote location. The client wanted to keep it simple


and avoid lighting effects that would make their pool house look like a hotel. So Craddock installed white function lighting elsewhere in the living space, kitchen and changing room. Outside in the garden, 11 heat-treated


copper wall sconces were installed around the façade of the building and along an old kitchen garden wall to the side. Then a total of seven copper spotlights were installed; one above


each doorway on the pool side of the building, one on the door to the kitchen garden, one on the front door and one on the pump room door. Four small mushroom-shaped copper path lights were then set along the perimeter of the tiny lawn. Finally, a Moonlighter was installed.


‘It’s a bright light, set high in the trees. It gives an effect like the moon shining through branches and casting shadows onto the lawn,’ explains Craddock. The Moonlighter has a tree-mounting strap and anti-glare cowl to keep the light angled downwards, and uses a 130W lamp to give the appearance of bright moonlight.


Contact Bruce Munro 01985 845 228 www.brucemunro.co.uk


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