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Glade Farms is not even a hamlet ... The country lies high, yet is no more than gently rolling. Looking toward the corner of the county the surface presents merely a gentle upward slope. There is no appearance of a mountain whatever. As the name implies, there are patches of glade in the neighborhood and some of these spots are marshy. In others are trenches where rock has been taken out to burn for lines. In a glade a quarter of a mile southwest is the site of the Morris fort. No ves- tige of this stockade remains and the spot is known only by tradition. But so long as necessity required its continuance, it was the nucleus of the Sandy Creek settlement. It seems to have been put up in 1774, and thither flocked the families form a considerable radius, whenever there was an Indian scare ... With the exception of the Spurgeons, the earlier settlers all moved away, and their places were taken by the Glovers, the Spahrs, the Beerbowers, and the Cuppetts ... The settlement of Preston began in 1766. The colonies which ten years after took the name of the United States of America were not at all the country into which they have since developed. As between themselves, they were thirteen independent, English-speaking nations ... the bond between them lay in the similarity of the institutions they had derived from England, in their acknowledging the king of England as their own ruler ... Virginia, the oldest colony was now 159 years old. Georgia, the youngest, was only 33 years old ... The population, which was doubling every twenty-three years, was rather less than 2,000,000 ... (and) only one-twentieth of the Americans lived in towns. Philadelphia and Boston were the largest cities ... The roads were usually very bad, those of Pennsylvania being the best. The streams were seldom bridged, and travel went by water whenever it could. It took a stage coach three days to flounder through the ninety miles of mud-holes between New York and Philadelphia ... Farming was the general occupation, and it was carried on in a crude, wasteful, and laborious manner ... Religion was comparatively free in Rhode Island and Pennsylvania. Elsewhere a state church was supported at public expense. In Virginia this church was the Episcopalian. People could be fined for not attending a certain number of times each year and no marriage was valid in the eye of the law unless performed by one of the established clergy ... The mails were few, slow, and irregular, and the frontier settlement did well to get mail once a month. In 1692, Virginia had pro- vided for one post office in each county ... Despite a popular opinion to the con- trary, our Revolutionary sires were not so democratic in matters of society and government as we are ourselves. Social lines were more or less in evidence ... To us the practice of medicine in the colonial time would seem barbaric. Hospitals, anesthetics, and antiseptic surgery were unknown. Sanitation was little observed, the true nature of many diseases was not understood, and the diseases themselves were treated in a blundering manner. Quacks were numerous, and in the South the doctor was not much thought of. Epidemics were destructive, and the faces of a larger share of the adult people were pitted with smallpox scars. As a net result of this condition of things, the death rate was high, especially among infants, although the birth rate was also high.206


206Ibid., p. 240, 241, 290, 291, 292. © 1993 Spurgeon Family History by Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, 1546 Devonshire Avenue, Westlake Village, CA 91361 • p. 53


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