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Peter Stull, John Johnson, of Kittocton, Shadrach Hyatt, Patrick Matthews, Elias Delashmutt, John Purdom, James Spurgeon, and John Jones, who acquitted the prisoner. Negro Peter, the slave of James Wardrop, for stealing a hat and axe from Richard Smith, was sentenced to receive thirty lashes at the whipping post. Negro George, the slave of Maj. Joseph Ogle and Morris Manyan, for stealing a bushel and a half of rye to the value of fifty pounds of tobacco, received 75 lashes. Jacob Benny, for keeping a tippling-house, was fined forty shillings, as were also eight others at the same term.”92


also as a “planter.” The woman bringing the suit was awarded £30 current money and 1,443 pounds of tobacco for her costs and charges. This shows that a “planter” was a planter of tobacco.93


Punishment by this court was limited to fines and/or imprisonment, or sentence to the


whipping post or pillory. On 15 November 1749, James Spurgeon recorded a bill of sale from John Israel of


Frederick County who sold him “all his corn, fattened hogs and all his house goods and everything he has but his wearing clothes, which goods he has bargained and made over in lain and open market for the value of six ponds to him in hand paid before the signing of this the 14 November 1749.”94


On 22 October 1750, “Thomas Wilson recorded supersedeas against Robert


Evans, James Sprugens, and John McFaden, for 419 pounds tobacco recovered against Robert Evans, 21 August in County court, plus costs, to be paid by 10 February next. Joseph Chapline, Thos. Prather, witnesses.”95


Supersedeas were recorded as the result of a fine or judgment of the


court. This was a mortgage deed in which the loser of a lawsuit and his bondsmen agrees that he owes the money, and if he fails to pay by a certain date, his goods, chattels or property may be taken. In this case, James Spurgeon was one of Thomas Wilson’s securities or bondsmen to keep him as the defendant out of jail.


James Spurgeon also appears in the Frederick County Tax Lists under Spurgeon/Spurgin


in 1753, 54, 55, 56, 59, 60, 61, 69, 70, 71, 72, and 73 under possession of the tracts named “Spurgeon’s Choice,” “Antietam,” “Trenton,” and “Stony Hill.”


James Spriggen, planter, also sold 25 acres of the land he purchased at Antietam Bottom


in 1741 called “Spriggens Delight” 21 August 1754 to Nathaniel Forster for £50 and 25 acres to Margaret and Thomas Forster for £70, the land being described as beginning “... at a bounded Hickory standing on the bank of the Potomac River and near Teaggs Ferry.”96


Though in the


deed the seller is referred to as one James Spriggen, it is signed by mark as James Spurgen and his wife signed by mark her release of right as dower as Susanah, wife of James Spurgens (the Forsters paid an alienation fine of one shilling). This is the same 50 acres recorded by James Spriggen 23 June 1741 in Prince Georges County (Frederick County in 1748).


In a breach of promise suit, his neighbor Charles Wood is identified


92Scharf, “History of Western Maryland,” p. 420. 93Millard M. Rice, “This Was The Life. Excerpts from the Judgment Records of Frederick County, Maryland [1748- 1765],” op. cit., pp. 33, 38. 94Patricia A. Anderson, “Frederick County Maryland Land Records, Liber B Abstracts, 1748-1752,” (Gaithersburg, Maryland, 1995), GenLaw Resources, p. 13. 95Ibid., p. 29. 96Frederick County, State of Maryland, Land Records,” Deed Book E, pp. 524-27.


© 1993 Spurgeon Family History by Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, 1546 Devonshire Avenue, Westlake Village, CA 91361 • p. 29


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