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loyalist leanings.73


Further information states that “William Spurgeon, son of William and Mary,


and his wife Mary Jane Sellers, along with William’s brother and John Spurgeon and mother Mary Spurgeon, sold their lands in Maryland and Virginia and moved to North Carolina in 1759. They bought land near Abbots Creek in Davidson County. William Spurgeon is listed in the 1759 Rowan County tax list as living in Spurgeon’s District.”74


A Davidson County Heritage


book says that “William Spurgeon was active in the King’s cause during the Revolutionary War. He was appointed a Justice for Rowan County and was commissioned a Colonel in the British Army. He fought in the Battle of Kettle Creek in Georgia in 1779. In his memorial to Upper Canada Land Petitions, he stated he joined Cornwallis and marched through the Carolinas and near the lines of Virginia. Mary Jane Spurgeon did not share her husband’s political views. She was an active patriot throughout the conflict. Her son John Spurgeon was sent by General Greene to scout the location of Cornwallis’ troops. As a result of William Spurgeon’s political actions, his properties were confiscated, and in the 1780’s he left North Carolina. Mary Jane elected to stay in North Carolina and is buried in Abbots Creek Primitive Baptist Cemetery. Many of William and Mary Jane’s children migrated West, but a son, Joseph Spurgeon, stayed in North Carolina and managed to buy back much of his father’s confiscated lands. He also become a State Senator.”75


Dates of surveys, warrants, and patents for land may not indicate the actual date of


settlement upon the land. However, deeds of small properties to misspelled names are good in- dications that actual settlement took place. Often times, such owners were squatters for several years before they could afford to purchase their property or before they were aware of the legal means to formal ownership and our Spurgeons may well have squatted for awhile in this area or lived on property owned by their former master, Richard Snowden, who was an absentee landlord.


In 1742, both James and his brother William signed a petition calling for the division of Prince George’s County and the creation of Frederick County.76


The petition read, “Petition to


Governor Thomas Bladen for division of Prince George’s County ‘from the mouth of Rock Creek to a bridge near Kennedy Farell’s and then east to the Patuxent River and along the River to Baltimore and Anne Arundel Counties,’ October 16, 1742.”77


On 7 March 1745, James Spurgeon is mentioned in a Also in that year, James Spurgen


and Wm Spirgen were petitioners in the seeking of the creation of All Saints’ Parish through the division of Prince George’s Parish.78


petition vs. Nicholas Mercer which suit was agreed to be dismissed.79 In 1749, James was appointed to oversee a project to improve “the river Road and


Richard Touchstone’s Road” (which Richard Touchstone owned property near James Spurgeon’s property “Trimbling”), in Prince George’s County Maryland near Catoctin


73“Spurgeon Quarterly,” Issue 20, December 1989, p. 491. 74Henry C. Peden, “Marylander’s to North and South Carolina Prior to 1800,” (1994), np., p. 182 75“The Heritage of Davidson County, North Carolina,” (1982), Genealogical Society of Davidson County, p. 558. 76“Pioneers of Old Monocacy,” op. cit., p. 225. 77“Maryland State Papers No. 1, The Black Books,” 3:9 (Portfolio); ¶ 454 in the Calendar. 78“The Maryland Diocesan Archives,” on deposit in the Maryland Historical Society; see Tracey & Dern, op. cit., p. 348. 79”Frederick County, Virginia Order Book,” Vol. 2, p. 57.


© 1993 Spurgeon Family History by Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, 1546 Devonshire Avenue, Westlake Village, CA 91361 • p. 26


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