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adjoining land. Mary Spurgin was listed as a landowner in Frederick County in that year. William may have died before 10 May 1748, when William Jr. moved to Virginia. William Jr. and his mother “widdow Spurgen” are both listed as adjacent land owners in warrant for Capt. Richard Morgan’s 24 September 1754 Lord Fairfax grant requested for 211 acres.59


Another land survey, on 1 June 1751,


“Mary


Spurgin, widow,” purchased land on Abbitts Creek in Rowan (Davidson) County, North Carolina with her son William Jr. 2 October 1760.60


relates, “Peter Bradford, of Frederick County, had 301 acres surveyed in said County. Survey by Mr. Guy Broadwater, adjoining properties of Thomas Sheppard, William Spurgen, William Morgan, and Judeth Lafferty.”61


William Spurgeon’s name even after William had died. A 1754 warrant and survey for Capt. Richard Morgan also mentions land on the Potomac adjoining the “Widdow Spurgen.”62


The Joseph Chapline mentioned above was the one under


survey by Capt. Richard Morgan was made 4 October 1756 for 211 acres in Frederick County, surveyed by Mr. Thomas Rutherford, “Near Potowmack River, adjoining Thomas Sheperd, land where Morgan lives, Wid. Spurgen.”63


whom some of the Spurgeons served in the French and Indian War in 1757/8. Moses and Joseph Chapline held large amounts of land in this area, together holding more than 14,000 acres in now Washington County. Colonel Joseph Chapline (1707-1769) was the founder of Sharpsburg. When he arrived in the Valley there were four houses in what is present-day Sharpsburg. One served as a combination blockhouse and Indian trading post.64


It is interesting that George


Washington did many land surveys in this area and would have been known by the Spurgeons as a young man. Perhaps this is why Washington stayed with James Spurgeon in 1784 at Bruceton Mills, Monongalia County, (West) Virginia on a survey trip for western water routes (infra).


In communication with Dr. Calvin Schildkneckt, Maryland and Pennsylvania genealogist


and historian, he kindly provided information about a William Mayo Map of 1736 of the Potomac (also known as the Map of the Northern Neck of Virginia) which gives the following names on the Maryland side downstream from Shepherdstown (listed going up-stream toward Shepherdstown): Senegar or Seneca Creek, Broad Run, Little Monockasy, Monockasy River, Little Creek (Tuscarorah), Muddy Branch, Calvin Falls, Antietam Creek, Spurgeant, Wagon Road to Philadelphia, Shepherd, Roan, Moor, etc. This would place the Spurgeant Settlement between the mouth of Antietam Creek and the Packhorse Ford of the Potomac. On the Virginia side of the Potomac beyond the mouth of the Shenandoah River were located: Peterson, Friend, Taylor, Surgeant, Chaplain, Paulson, Williams, etc.65


The deed for this land is noted in the 1739-


1741 Rent Rolls for Frederick County, Virginia. These rent rolls show Anteatum (sic) Bottom, 300 acres, surveyed 4 August 1739 for John Moore:66


59“Spurgeon Quarterly,” Issue 46, September 1996, p. 355 [Joyner, “Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys, Frederick County,” pp. 109, 140]. 60Ibid. [Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 4, p. 341]. 61“Virginia Northern Neck book”,


[Land record G-524], p. 49.


62“Spurgeon Quarterly,” Issue 20, December 1989, p. 490. 63“Virginia Northern Neck Book”,


[Land record H-694], p. 87.


64John W. Schildt, “Drums Along the Antietam,” (Parsons, W.V., 1972), McClain Printing Company, p. 23. 65Calvin Schildknecht, ed., “Monocacy and Catoctin,” Vol. II [Settlers in Western Maryland and Adjacent Pennsylvania and Their Descendants 1725-1988], (Westminster, Maryland, upcoming publication), Family Line Publications, Chapter 4 “Early Roads, Fords, and Bridges”. 66“Spurgeon Quarterly,” Issue 33 (June 1933), p. 127. Original document found in “Frederick County Rent Roll,” Vol. 4, p. 527-527a].


© 1993 Spurgeon Family History by Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, 1546 Devonshire Avenue, Westlake Village, CA 91361 • p. 23


Apparently, the surveyor recorded the land as it was known in Another


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