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MAYOR JOHN HIEFTJE, ANN ARBOR, MI (POP. 114,386)


“Energy conservation is the forte of municipal government,” Mayor Hieftje once said, and during his tenure Ann Arbor has become a recognized national leader in municipal energy programs. The city’s Municipal Energy Office institutionalized energy conservation to save more than $5 million over the past decade. Ann Arbor was the first U.S. city to announce that it would convert all of its downtown streetlights to energy- saving LEDs. And Mayor Hieftje’s “Mayor’s Green Energy Challenge” calls for the entire community of Ann Arbor to be powered by 20% renewable energy by 2015 and to install 5,000 solar systems on Ann Arbor rooftops.


MAYOR MICHAEL BLOOMBERG, NEW YORK, NY (POP. 8,363,710)


Perhaps the quintessential innovator in city government, the business- minded mayor re-popularized the maxim, “you can’t manage what you can’t measure,” with his unprecedented dedication to analysis and data collection to inform the direction of his groundbreaking sustainability plan, PlaNYC. Mayor Bloomberg encourages his staff to develop bold initiatives to meet PlaNYC’s 10 aggressive goals, like the “Greener Greater Buildings Plan” to require energy audits in large commercial buildings, and the “1,000 Green Supers” training program. Like any business innovator, Mayor Bloomberg isn’t afraid to take risks with politically volatile measures such as congestion pricing and a plan to incentivize hybrid taxi fleets.


STEVE BELLONE, SUPERVISOR, TOWN OF BABYLON, NY (POP. 211,792)


Supervisor Bellone’s success underscores the fact that big cities aren’t the only ones who can hatch innovative ideas and become national leaders on local sustainability. Bellone, a LEED AP, led the launch of Long Island Green Homes in 2008, the nation’s first property assessed clean energy (PACE) program to help homeowners surmount the upfront costs of making energy efficiency improvements—and dramatically save money and reduce GHG emissions. The town lends homeowners a sum of money, and they pay it back via property taxes. If they move, the loan stays with the property, not the homeowner. Thanks to Babylon’s trailblazing, PACE programs are now sweeping the country.


MAYOR CARLOS ALVAREZ, MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FL (POP. 2,466,827)


Mayor Alvarez is shepherding the development of Miami-Dade’s forthcoming sustainability plan to address a range of economic, energy, transportation, and environmental challenges— including the reality that South Florida is one of America’s most vulnerable areas to climate change. Miami-Dade has produced a thorough Sustainability Assessment Report that includes detailed forecasts of potential climate impacts, such as sea level rise from 1.5 to 3 feet by 2060. The county is a recognized leader in the emerging field of climate adaptation.


JAY FISETTE, BOARD CHAIR, ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA (POP. 212,200)


A longtime advocate of smart growth policies and regional collaboration in metropolitan Washington D.C., County Chair Fisette has more recently championed efforts to reduce carbon emissions and bring together diverse community stakeholders to help create a long- term Community Energy Plan. As president of the Virginia Municipal League, Fisette created Go Green Virginia, a friendly competition among Virginia cities, towns, and counties that amass “green points” by implementing selected actions and policies related to energy efficiency, land use, waste management, air quality, and other categories.


Local Action Moves the World • www.icleiusa.org


PLANET EARTH \\ LEADING BY INNOVATION


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