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food/drink 5


OF THE BEST...


online Welsh ciders


Pasty after weeks indoors watching the World Cup? Enjoy some sunshine, light up the barbie and relax with a few bottles of Welsh cider – delivered straight to your door.


BLAENGAWNEY CIDER Crumlin, Newport. 01495 244691 / www.blaengawneycider.co.uk Andy and Annie started cidermaking so they could enjoy free drink all year round. Share their passion with their award-winning range: National Treasure (sweet), True Welshman (medium/dry) and Heartbreaker (dry). You can now also try a tipple on the farm itself (by appointment only).


GWYNT Y DDRAIG Llantwit Fardre, Pontypridd. 01443 209 852 / www.gwyntcider.com Bill and Andrew started with one remit: to make cider using traditional methods. There were no plans beyond this – apart from being slightly drunk, that is. Their expanding range now includes seven varieties of cider including the extra fruity Autumn Magic which contains blackberries.


RALPH’S CIDER New Radnor, Presteigne. 01544 350304 / www.ralphsciderfestival.co.uk Tradition is an important word at Ralph’s Cider. Cider is made using traditional methods on a traditional cider press. Ralph’s grow the fruit, mill and press all the juice, then ferment, mature and bottle the cider on the farm.


TAFFY APPLES – TOMAS WATKIN Fforestfach, Swansea. 01792 560020 / www.tomoswatkin.com Strong Celtic cider that’s thirst quenching and delicious. Tomos Watkin’s advice? “No ice, no blarney, no gimmicks. Straight from the fridge, chilled to the core.” Done!


TOLOJA ORCHARDS Lampeter, Ceredigion. 01570471295 / www.pembrokeshireproducedirect.org.uk All bar one of their ciders are named after an Arthurian character, including Guinevere, Lancelot and even drunk Dewi, complete with inebriated caricatures on the bottle. Toloja ciders are bound to raise a smile on even the gloomiest of summer days.


To read more about these producers visit www.fork2fork.org.uk BUZZ 34


RECIPE tuscan


panzanella salad


words RUTH JOSEPH


WE are now enjoying the sweet, sandaled days of summer and no one wants to stay in the kitchen for hours preparing food. So maybe think Italian, for their ingenuity in creating luscious, summer food is renowned. Try this recipe I learned while I was filming in Tuscany. It cleverly uses stale bread, but the bread has to be good quality. Think artisan sourdough, ciabatta or focaccia as your base and the freshest salad ingredients and basil you can manage. When I first came across this recipe I was a little unsure as to whether I’d like something that had soggy bread at its base, but try it – it’s delicious. Make it in the cool of the morning and serve it, if you like, with barbe- cued fish, meats or sausages or, if you’re a veggie, you may wish to add a rinsed tin of borlotti beans, or even torn pieces of mozza- rella cheese. If you prefer croutons, bake off the torn bread pieces with a drizzle of olive oil until crisp. But this is not traditionally Tuscan.


Follow with Italian peaches sliced with a dust- ing of caster sugar laid decoratively in a dish, and pour over a generous amount of Italian white sparkling wine or Prosecco. Perfect!


SERVES four to six


INGREDIENTS 1 red onion, finely sliced / 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed / 400gms fresh tomatoes I large, stale Italian ciabatta bread or any stale sourdough bread / I head celery, finely chopped / 1 red pepper, deseeded and chopped / 1 green pepper, deseeded and chopped / 1 tbsp salted capers, rinsed / 25gms fresh basil, torn into shreds / 30ml virgin olive oil / 30ml red wine vinegar


PREPARATION • Cut bread into pieces. Soak with a little water. Squeeze well.


• Add chopped vegetables. • Pour over oil and vinegar. • Chill and enjoy.


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