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craft fairs has been a regular activity for us both for a long time. Until we started to research the marketplace, as non-crafters ourselves, we were unaware of sites like Etsy, Misi, Folksy etc. We knew about Not on the High Street who seem to always be emailing newsletters or posting out catalogues and we decided that we wanted to try and ‘be a bit of both’ – adopt similar marketing tactics to NOTHS, yet remain small and approachable, focussing on helping people promote and sell their crafts as themselves rather than as a massive collective. It is still early days, but we think we are already achieving this.

How did you come up with the name WowThankYou?

Tracey is guilty for this! She was out in her car one day trying to think up

a name, and thought “what is the one response you hope to get when someone opens a present you’ve bought them?” Wow, Thank you!

What jobs did you have before WowThankYou?

Prior to taking time out of our careers Tracey was (and still is) a freelance business and technology journalist who writes about everything from pharmaceuticals to reviewing cruise ships and hotels. Georgena worked in IT for over a decade as an engineer and system manager, then retrained to become a special needs tutor but then fell pregnant and felt she would be better off as a stay at home mum, always looking for ways to work from home to give her the freedom to be with her children in their formative years. We have both been actively using the internet for more years

than either of us care to admit and being human (and female), when you’re working online and an advert pops up for a shop you’ve not visited for a while – well, you can’t avoid clicking on it can you?!

Do you have any kind of formal education/training or experience that helped with creating WowThankYou?

Tracey: Well, academically I’m an environmental biologist! Throughout university I wanted to be the new David Attenborough - but he cruelly dashed my ambition by telling me it just wasn’t going to happen. So, as a fresh graduate I landed a temporary writing position at a pharmaceutical publishing company – and this progressed into editor, then publisher – and then I left the rat-race and became a freelance journalist.

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