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Sector 2. The Line Islands, the Cook Islands, the Samoa Islands, and the Tonga Islands

2.19

Tema Reef (11°05'S., 165°38'W.) lies about 14 miles SE of the

Danger Islands. The reef was reported to lie 2 miles S of its charted position. The reef is about 0.3 mile in diameter and breaks heavily, but no rocks show above water. On a good day, with the wind less than force 4, the reef has been sighted at 8 or 9 miles. Breakers have been reported (1986) to lie about 140 miles SSW of Tema Reef, and may best be seen on the chart.

2.19

The Samoa Islands

2.20 The Samoa Islands (Navigator Islands) (13°25’S. to

14°30’S.; 168°00’W. to 173°00’W.) consists of two groups, which are commonly referred to as American Samoa and West- ern Samoa.

2.20

The islands comprising American Samoa are Tutuila Island,

Aunuu Island, Ofu Island, Olosega Island, Tau Island, and Rose Atoll. Western Samoa comprises the islands of Upolu Island and Savai’i Island.

2.20

Winds—Weather.—The prevailing winds, or so-called

trade winds, come from a direction more nearly E, blowing be- tween ESE and NNE. They are fairly constant through the dry season, but during the wet season they are fitful, and are fre- quently broken by periods of calm.

2.20

The islands lie within the typhoon area of the W Pacific.

Typhoons occur from January to March, and occasionally up to the middle of April.

2.20

The year divides itself distinctly, but not sharply into a dry

season, May to November, and a wet season, November to April. The wettest month, January, has a range of 127 to 1,651mm. The annual rainfall has also varied this much. The climate varies little from year to year, because of the

2.20

great area of water surrounding the group. December is the hottest month, with an average excess of only about 2° over the mean temperature for July, the coldest month.

2.20

Regulations.—See U.S. Coast Pilot 7 for general regula-

tions concerning navigation in United States waters. Specific regulations will be given with the description of the area they affect.

Caution.—Caution should be exercised in the vicinity of American Samoa, as several Fish Aggregating Devices have been moored at off-lying deep-water locations around Tutuila, and other positions around the group. These devices may drift off position, and/or concentrations of fishing vessels may be found in their vicinity.

2.20 2.20

The devices are comprised of aluminum catamaran floats

painted orange and white. Each device carries white daymark, fitted with the letter designation of the device, and a flashing white light. The devices offer good radar returns.

2.21 Rose Atoll (14°33'S., 168°09'W.), the farthest E of

the Samoa Islands, is nearly square in shape; its sides are about 1.5 miles in length. Sand Island, inside the reef on the N extremity, is merely a sand spot.

A large clump of trees, 20m high, stands on Rose Atoll. There is a boat channel into the lagoon, close W of the N extremity of the reef.

2.21 2.21 2.21

Tides—Currents.—Tidal currents off Rose Atoll are re-

ported to set NE and SW, with the SW or ebb current being the stronger.

Tutuila Island

2.23 Tutuila Island (14°19'S., 170°42'W.) is about 17

miles long in an ENE-WSW direction, 5 miles wide, and rises to a height of 653m. A wooded mountain ridge extends nearly

Pub. 126

2.21

43

Regulations.—Rose Atoll is a National Wildlife Refuge

managed by the Department of Interior. Entry is strictly pro- hibited without prior approval.

2.21

The Manua Islands (14°13'S., 169°33'W.) consists of three

islands which extend over an area of about 17 miles in an ESE- WNW direction. The group is clear of dangers as far as known. Tau Island (14°15'S., 169°28'W.) is the farthest E of the

2.21

three islands which comprise the Manua Islands. The island is about 5.8 miles long E-W, is dome-shaped, and rises to a height of 966m. It is covered with vegetation.

Maafee Islet is located close offshore, about 0.3 mile S of the W extremity of the island.

2.21 2.21

Tides—Currents.—The tidal currents at the Faleasau an-

chorage flows SW on the ebb at 1 to 2 knots, and the flood flows NW at 1 to 2 knots. At the Luma anchorage, the ebb flows S and the flood N at a similar rate.

2.21

Anchorage.—Faleasau (Faleasao), on the NW side of the

island, affords sheltered anchorage, in 27m, during the trade winds, but a vessel should be prepared to weigh anchor with any change. Anchorage may be obtained, in 24m, coral, with Fitiuta Point, the NE extremity of the island, bearing 080°, distant 0.4 mile. Fair anchorage can also be obtained at Luma village on the W side of the island opposite a conspicuous white church.

2.21

Caution.—A shoal, with a depth of 40m, lies about 1.3

miles, bearing 279°, from the W extremity of Tau Island. It lies in an area that has experienced submarine volcanic action. Volcanic activity was reported (2001) approximately 36 miles SE of Tau Island in position 14°34.5'S 168°55.5'W.

2.22 Olosega Island (14°11'S., 169°37'W.), 6 miles NW

of Tau Island, rises nearly perpendicularly on its W side to a height of 639m. The coral reef surrounding the island consists of two regular shelves, one beyond the other.

2.22

There is fair anchorage, except during the trade winds, in

33m, coral, S of the W extremity of Olosega, and in 27m, sand, NE of the same extremity.

2.22

Ofu Island (14°11'S., 169°39'W.) is separated from Olosega

Island by Asaga Strait, which is about 0.2 mile wide. Ofu is nearly 3 miles long in an E-W direction, and about 1.5 miles at its widest point. The island rises to 494m in its SE part. Two islets lie off the W side of the island. The coastal reef extends about 0.2 mile from Ofu Island to these islets.

A light is shown from the island’s W end. A stranded wreck lies on the reef close NW of the light.

2.22 2.22

Depths—Limitations.—Significant improvements have

been made to Ofu Harbor. The newly-built harbor is protected by a breakwater and has an excellent pier fac, approximately 30m in length, for small craft. The alongside depth and turning basin has a reported controlling depth of 4.9m. A boat ramp exists for launching and recovering small craft.

A 47m bank lies about 23 miles WNW of Ofu Island; a 62m bank lies about 28 miles SW of the island.

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