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Sector 2. The Line Islands, the Cook Islands, the Samoa Islands, and the Tonga Islands

2.5 Teraina Island (Washington) (4°43'N., 160°24'W.)

lies about 120 miles SE of Palmyra Atoll. It is administered as part of the Republic of Kiribati.

2.5

The island is about 3m high and is covered with a luxuriant

growth of coconut and other trees. It is reported to be visible at 14 miles.

2.5

The fringing reef extends about 0.5 mile off the E part of the

island and for some distance off the N side. At the W end, two tongues of reef extend from 0.3 to 0.4 mile offshore. In all other parts the shore reef is narrow.

Off the W side of the island, a bank, deepening gradually, has depths of 18.3 to 26m, 2.3 miles offshore.

2.5 2.5

Tides—Currents.—As Teraina Island lies near the S edge

the Equatorial Countercurrent, great variations in the strength and direction of the offshore currents may be expected. For this reason, every opportunity should be taken to fix the position of the ship when in this vicinity.

2.5

Anchorage.—Anchorage is available on the bank off the is-

land’s W sides, in general depths of 13 to 31m. Caution is ad- vised, however, as this area is often affected by heavy swell; working cargo here has been described as the most difficult and dangerous in the Pacific Ocean. Care must be taken to find a sandy bottom before letting go, as there are many deep holes in which anchors have been lost.

2.5

Anchorage is good when the Northeast Trades are light, but

has been found very uncomfortable on occasions when they are strong enough to raise a sea and the countercurrent is setting strongly E, swinging a vessel across the sea. Such conditions are reported to be frequent from September to December. A recommended berth is 0.5 mile offshore, in depths of 9 to

2.5

11m, with the N and S tangents of the island’s W end bearing 075° and 121°, respectively.

2.6 Tabuaeran (Fanning Atoll) (3°52'N., 159°20'W.) is administered as a part of the Republic of Kiribati. The District Commissioner for Tabuaeran is resident at Kiritimati Atoll. The islands of the atoll are thickly covered with coconut trees, 18.3 to 27m high, visible at a distance of about 15 miles. The barrier reef is not more than 0.6 to 1.2m high, except on

2.6 2.6

the N and E sides, which are about 3m high. The reef is steep- to; on the N and NW side of the atoll the 200m line lies about 0.5 mile offshore.

2.6

Winds—Weather.—The prevailing winds are from E to the

ENE. Average velocities are about 10 knots, with occasional gusts up to 40 knots. Gale force winds average less than 1 day per year. Rainfall averages 190mm. The dry season extends from August to November. There is no fog.

2.6

Tides—Currents.—The currents in the vicinity of Teraina

are strong and variable; when in the vicinity every opportunity should be taken to fix the vessel’s position.

2.7 English Harbor (3°51'N., 159°22'W.) (World Port

Index No. 56039) is located within the barrier reef near the center of the SW side of the island; it is a natural harbor. A settlement is situated on the S side of the entrance.

2.7

Tides—Currents.—There is little tide in English Harbor,

but normally the flood current runs until 10 minutes after HW and the ebb current runs until 20 minutes after LW. Slack water lasts only about 10 to 15 minutes. The flood current runs at a rate of 4.5 to 5 knots, and the ebb at a rate of 7 knots. Both

Tabuaeran—Lagoon entrance

currents are affected by the force and direction of the wind. On the ebb tide, rips and overfalls extending from the spit on the N side to near the middle of the channel might be dangerous to small craft.

2.7

Depths—Limitations.—The navigable channel, with a least

depth of 5.8m, is reduced to a width of less than 46m by the reef extending a short distance off Weston Point, the S entrance point, and the drying patches extending halfway across the pass from Danger Point, the N entrance point.

2.7

Aspect.—A conspicuous flagstaff stands on Weston Point.

A light is shown on request from a stone monument standing about 45m ENE of the point. Take care not to confuse the light with an uncharted chimney close SW of it. The monument was reported obscured from seaward. A radar-conspicuous wreck stands about 1.3 miles NW of the harbor entrance.

Pilotage.—Pilotage for the harbor is necessary and is avail- able from the settlement on the E side of Weston Point. Anchorage.—Anchorage may be taken with the crane on

2.7 2.7

Cartwright Point bearing 085°, and a white pier in alignment with a palm tree painted white, both of which are situated 0.3 mile S of Weston Point, bearing 138°. Small vessels usually anchor E of Terania Light, but shoaling and a tug moored in the vicinity make for uncertain depths and swinging room. Both bow anchors, and a stream anchor should be used here as English Harbor is exposed to squally NE and E winds.

2.7

Vessels may anchor in Whaler Anchorage, 3.8 miles NNW

of English Harbor, in 27m, with the beacons in line 121°, about 0.3 mile offshore. Vessels are cautioned not to anchor S of the alignment, as it marks the N limit of a cable area best seen on the chart. It was reported that the beacons may have disap- peared or become overgrown.

2.7

Caution.—Shoaling has been reported in English Harbor.

2.8 Kiritimati Atoll

(Christmas Island) (1°52'N.,

157°22'W.) is about 27 miles long SE-NW and is 16 miles wide in the N part. A neck extending from near the center of the atoll toward the SE is about 4 miles wide; this part is low- lying scrub land, with trees adjacent to the coast. The island is about 12m high in the NW part, where there are growths of

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