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Sector 10. Micronesia, Palau, and Guam

nel leading through Northeast Pass to Moen (Weno) Island is marked by IALA Maritime Buoyage System (Region A) and swept to a depth of 11m. The harbor may also be approached through North Pass.

10.18

Passages leading into the lagoon are numerous, however,

only those passages swept are free of mines for shipping on a risk acceptable basis.

North Pass (7°41'N., 151°48'E.) has a channel 0.5 mile wide and swept to a depth of 17m.

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Piaanu Pass (7°20'N., 151°26'E.) has a channel 0.5 mile wide and swept to a depth of 18m.

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South Pass (7°13'N., 151°48'E.) has a channel 463m wide and swept to a depth of 17m.

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Aspect.—The islands in the lagoon are divided roughly into

two groups. The Shiki Islands, in the E half, consists of Moen, (Weno), Dublon Island, Fefan, Uman, and their adjacent islets. The Shichiyo Islands, in the W half, consists of Udot, Ulalu, Faleosicz, Tol, Onamue, and their adjacent islets.

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Moen (Weno) is first sighted by vessels entering the lagoon

through North Pass or Northeast Pass. Moen (Weno) is a complex mountainous mass of volcanic rock dominated by Mount Teroken. The coastal lowland on the W side is relatively wide and consists mainly of fresh water marshes and artificial fill. The lowlands in the E part are mainly mangrove swamps and scattered beaches. Moen (Weno) is the largest of the E group of the high volcanic islands.

10.18

Moen (Weno) consists of two mountain masses separated by

a deep gap. North of this gap is Mount Ton Azan, with a double summit. The S summit, Mount Toladjau, culminates in a steep cylinder of rock. The N summit, Mount Vine Pur, is somewhat lower and rounded, but has a rocky promontory on the W side. Moen (Weno) is fringed by reefs and fronted by dangers. A white cylindrical tower, 12.8m high, stands on a 76m hill

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at the E end of the island and is visible while entering North- east Pass. In 1985, a vessel reported that the tower was visible only on certain bearings due to the growth of vegetation. The same vessel also reported that the tower is not readily visible from Northeast Pass.

10.19 Moen (Weno) (7°26'N., 151°50'E.) (World Port Index

No. 56600) is a small harbor located in Uola Roads, on the W side of Moen (Weno) Island. It is a first port of entry. There is a concrete pier, 92m long, dredged to a depth of 7.3m on the W side. The SE side of the pier is 99m long and is reported to have a depth of 8.5m alongside. A channel and turning basin, both dredged to a depth of 8.5m, are situated W of the pier. Caution is advised as the channel is unmarked. Although the reefs to the N and S of the channel are readily identifiable dur- ing unfavorable winds, a single-screw vessel without assistance might experience difficulty backing out from the SE side of the pier due to the closeness of the reef to the S.

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An active airfield with scheduled airline service lies on the

NW side of the island. Landing aircraft make their approach from the SW and vessels should avoid anchoring in their flight path. A radio antenna is situated at the S end of the airstrip. A prominent tower stands near the airfield on the N side of the is- land. A beacon is situated on Pisiras (Scheiben) Island, about 1.5 miles NW of the airport.

Dublon Island (7°22'N., 151°52'E.) is deeply indented on its E side by a bay. Mount Tolomen and Mount Foukenau rise

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from the main mass of the island. Two peninsulas projecting E from these mountains form the above bay. Volcanic slopes on the island are steep, except in saddles between the above peaks and at the base of each peninsula. A basaltic cliff stands on the S side of Mount Tolomen.

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The island is wooded, and except at the NE extremity, there

are many dense mangrove forests on the coast. A large part of the coastal lowland is covered with artificial fill which forms an irregular band around most of the island.

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A fisheries pier, reported to have a length of 76m on its SSE

side and 46m on its W face, lies on the SE side of the island, but no details are presently available on the facility. Except for a large conspicuous petroleum tank at the head of the fisheries pier, most of the facilities shown on the large scale chart have been destroyed or covered with growth.

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Eten Island, about 0.5 mile SE of Dublon Island, has a nearly

flat plain at the NE end and a flat plain at the SW end. Along the NW side is a flat plain which has been extended by filling out on the reef.

Pilotage.—English-speaking pilots board vessels about 2 miles outside Northeast Pass during daylight hours.

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Anchorage.—The area between Dublon Island and Eten

Island has been swept to various depths, and is considered to be a good anchorage. Care must be taken when approaching the anchorage to avoid the many wrecks and shoals in the vicinity of Dublon Island and Eten Island.

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Anchorage can be taken, in 12.8 to 42m, about 1.5 miles SW

of the N end of Moen (Weno). The bottom is uneven, but soft. Vessels should avoid anchoring in the flight path for the ap- proach to the runway on the NW side of Moen (Weno). An- chorage can also be taken off the SE side of the same island. Vessels can take temporary anchorage, just inside the barrier reef in the vicinity of North Pass and South Pass.

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Caution.—The swept areas and channels, best seen on the

chart, that lead from the main passes to the anchorages off the main islands are declared dangerous due to mines. Due to the elapse of time, the risk in this area to surface navigation is now considered no more dangerous than the ordinary risks of navi- gation; but a very real risk still exists with regard to anchoring, fishing, or any form of submarine or seabed activity.

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Ships should veer anchor and cable if anchoring, and sub-

marines should not bottom in the channels due to the danger of detonating inactive mines.

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Moen (Weno) anchorage has been swept and is considered

safe for navigation. The area in the vicinity of Eten Island is safe for surface navigation only. Anchoring, dredging, piledriv- ing, trawling, and submarine bottoming should be avoided. The reefs on each side of South Pass (7°13'N., 151°48'E.) are hard to identify due to the general color of the water. Vessels should navigate with caution and only under favor-

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able conditions of light, as most of the dangers in the lagoon are unmarked.

Numerous submarine cables, the positions of which are shown on the charts, are found within the lagoon.

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Numerous wrecks lie in the lagoon, especially in the general

vicinity of Dublon Island, Fefan Island, and Uman Island. The floor of the lagoon is littered with bombs.

10.20 The Hall Islands (8°40'N., 152°00'E.) consist of two large atolls, Murilo Atoll and Nomwin Atoll, separated by a

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