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10.2

Sector 10. Micronesia, Palau, and Guam

From March to May, E of 140°E, the countercurrent appears

to be confined to a narrow belt between 6°N and 8°N. North of the latter parallel, the North Equatorial Current flows through the group, and S of the former parallel the South Equatorial Current, if found. During the same months, W of 140°E, the Equatorial Countercurrent, setting E or NE is found. The Republic of Palau lies on or near the boundary between this countercurrent and the North Equatorial Current; the Yap Is- lands lie within the latter current.

10.2

The ocean currents among the Caroline Islands are rather ir-

regular due to the obstructing islands and banks, the tides, and the monsoon drifts. The irregularity appears to be consider- able between 7°N and 8°N.

10.2

The Mariana Islands lie entirely in the region of the W cur-

rent. This current is generally strongest and most constant in the S part of the group, from near Saipan Island S, since this is located in the North Equatorial Current. The N part of the group lies in the North Subtropical Current, which is weaker and less constant, particularly from June to August. In the vici- nity of the islands the W current changes its direction and the rate is generally increased N of the Mariana Islands, the region of variable currents is found.

10.2

In the East Caroline Islands, the rise is small, the diurnal

inequality is considerable, and the tides are complicated. In the West Caroline Islands, the diurnal inequality is small, and the tides are regular.

10.2

West of 140°E, there is a slight inequality, except at full and

change in spring and fall. The difference in height between successive HW is small; it is from 0.6 to 0.9m between suc- cessive LW.

10.2

Between 140°E and 147°E, and in the Mariana Islands,

semi-diurnal tides prevail at springs during spring and fall. At other times, the daily inequality in the time and height of successive high and low tides is considerable. The diurnal inequality is greatest when the moon is farthest from the Equator. When the diurnal inequality is great, one LW disap- pears and the other becomes extremely low.

10.2

The tides between 147°E and 160°E are peculiar and comp-

licated. Here there is considerable diurnal inequality with often a single daily tide, especially in winter.

10.3 Kosrae Island (5°20'N., 163°00'E.) is one of the most

beautiful islands in the western Pacific and is the easternmost island of the Federated States of Micronesia. It is composed of basalt and is so fertile that almost any tropical plant can be grown. It is hilly and covered with dense forests. Mount Buache, located in the N portion of the island, is rounded. Mount Crozer, located near the middle of the island, is steep. A deep valley lies between these two mountains, dividing the island into two parts. The coasts are bordered by a wide belt of mangroves and other trees. The S coast is fringed by mangrove islets, more or less connected by reefs.

10.3

Cape Tupinier (5°16'N., 163°01'E.), the SE extremity of

Kosrae Island, is low, rounded, and backed by wooded areas. A narrow reef fringes the point.

10.4 Port Lottin (5°17'N., 162°58'E.) (World Port Index

No. 56580), situated on the S side of the island, is suitable only for small vessels with local knowledge. It provides good shel- ter from the Northeast Trades. The entrance is 225m wide

Pub. 126

Kosrae Island

between the reefs and is deep. A rock, 0.9m high, stands on the reef on the E side of the entrance. The reefs are hard to identify after heavy rains. Two small wharves and a pier are situated in the harbor.

10.4

Coquille Harbor (Okat Harbor) (5°21'N., 162°57'E.) is the

only commercial port for international trade on Kosrae and is located on the NW side of the island. Large numbers of fishing vessels land catches for export to Japan via Guam. The port also handles container, oil, and bulk cargo.

10.4

Depths—Limitations.—The controlling vessel dimensions

for the approach channel are a length of 152m and a breadth of 30m. The channel, marked by lighted buoys, is 500m long, 91m wide, and has a least depth of 50m.

10.4

Vessels of 9,000 grt with a maximum length of 129m and a

maximum draft of 8.2m regularly use the port. The wharf is 167m long, with a depth of 9.1m alongside.

10.4

Aspect.—Range lights, in line bearing 095°, lead through

the approach channel to the entrance of the turning basin. From the turning basin, which has a radius of 457m, the track leads NE for 600m to the berth.

10.4

Three mooring buoys on the E edge of the turning basin have

been laid for the use of fishing vessels when berths are occu- pied.

10.4

An airstrip is situated N of the wharf.

10.4

Pilotage.—Pilotage is compulsory for vessels over 300grt

when calling for the first time. Pilots are available from 0600 to 1800 and board in the vicinity of position 5°21'N, 162°56'E, about 1 mile W of the entrance to the approach channel. The vessel’s ETA should be sent via its agents 48 hours and

10.4

24 hours prior to arrival. Contact should be made directly with the pilots when within VHF range.

10.4

Caution.—The mast height of vessels in excess of 300 grt

may be higher than the adjacent airport runway approach sur- face. Vessels must coordinate with the port authority and adjust their arrival and departure times to avoid conflicting with air- craft movements.

10.4

Mariners must take care to ensure they correctly identify the

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