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218

Sector 8. The Solomon Islands—Central and West Parts

high. Manggo Bay (7°19'S., 157°04'E.) lies between these points, but has not been fully surveyed, although a vessel’s survey found a number of dangers in its SW part.

The land rises steeply to a series of irregular ranges of con- siderable height which are heavily wooded and very difficult to distinguish as the coast trends S to Sambe Point. The mariner should be able to identify the summits of Mount Sambe, Mount Keleve, and Mount Tomba and Mount Lou Cone, 3 miles NNW of Mount Sambe. These summits are frequently covered by clouds.

8.15 8.15

Caution. —Many reefs and islets front the coast from Sambi

Head to Muzo Island and extend up to 2.5 miles offshore. Vessels should keep at least 3 miles off Sumbi Point, 9 miles off Saasa Point, and 5 miles offshore between Muzo Island and Sambe Point. Extreme caution must be exercised if the 183m curve is crossed, as the area within it has not been surveyed and reefs are usually found within this curve. These conditions pre- vail in the stretch of coastline between Muzo Island and Cape Labee. Reefs and shoals here reach seaward for a distance up to 4.5 miles, the positions of which can best be seen on the chart. A vessel approaching the Choiseul Group from the SE will

8.15

first sight Kumboro Peak and soon thereafter identify some of the peaks on the range running W along this part of the coast, followed by Haycock Island, Raverave, Ghiri along with Sunda and Undalou, about 1.5 miles NE of Ghiri. The islands of Rengge and Muzo, about 9 and 16 miles WNW, respectively, of Ghiri will also be able to be identified. The identity of the islands mentioned can best be made at long range as they come up against the partially dipped background of Vaghena Island and Rob Roy Island.

The New Georgia Islands

8.16 The New Georgia Islands are separated from Choiseu

Islandl and Santa Isabel, about 30 and 50 miles NE, respect- ively, by New Georgia Sound. The largest islands are volcanic in origin and the mountains are in quite symmetrical cones. They rise from 900 to more than 1,200m, and their summits are often lost in the clouds. Submarine volcanic manifestations have been reported in the S approaches to the group. The sur- vey of these islands is very incomplete, generally dating from the end of the 19th century.

8.16

New Georgia (New Georgia Island) (8°20'S., 157°30'E.) is

the largest of this group. The description of the group will be counterclockwise from the SE portion. The S coast of New Georgia will be described with Blanche Channel in paragraph 8.32.

8.16

Nggatokae (Gatukai) (8°47'S., 158°11'E.) is bold and steep

except on the N. The summit of Nggatokae is a volcanic cone, flattened at the top, rising 887m into the clouds. Cape Pitt, forming the SE part of Nggatokae, is a bold, dark cliff. A bay NW of Peava Village is clear of dangers, but there is no an- chorage for a vessel.

Kicha Island, a small wooded island with no fringing reef, lies 5 miles ENE of Cape Pitt.

8.16 8.16

Mbulo Island, separated from Kicha Island to the SE by a

deep channel, is a densely-wooded island that is steep-to, except at one place on its E side. It is of coral formation.

Pub. 126

8.16

Malemale Island (Male Male Island) is small and low. A

steep-to reef, which breaks if there is a swell, extends 0.2 mile from the island.

8.16

Brougham Shoal (9°02'S., 158°18'E.) is an unexamined off-

lying danger about 15 miles S of Mbulo Island, reported to have a least depth of 7.3m. It may break in heavy weather. Shoal water exists in an area of about 4 miles, 15.5 miles SW

8.16

of the S point of Nggatokae. The area has been frequented by numerous underwater volcanic activity.

8.17 Vangunu Island (8°40'S., 158°00'E.) is SE of the

principal islands of the New Georgia Islands. It is located about 60 miles WNW of the Russel Islands. It is separated from New Georgia by the narrow and tortuous Njai Pass. Reefs and islands surround VangunuIsland on all sides, delimiting two big lagoons, Kolo Lagoon and Marovo Lagoon on the E and W. Marovo Island has been surveyed and can be approached by breaks in the barrier reef.

8.17

The extinct volcano that constitutes the major part of the is-

land culminates in Mount Vangunu (8°41'S., 158°00'E.). The crown of the crater, which is open to the SE, has 700 to 1,100m high summits that are usually hidden in clouds. The Mbareke Peninsula, on the NE side of the island, while not as high as Mount Vangunu, has several remarkable summits.

8.17

The series of long but narrow coral islands extending N from

Nggatokae Island and running parallel with the NE shores of Vangunu Island and New Georgia are evidently an upheaved ancient barrier reef; they are all densely wooded and are referred to as Tomba by the natives. With the exception of Minfanga Island (Mboli Island) (8°41'S., 158°13'E.), none of the barrier islands are inhabited. The channel between the two barrier walls is deep, ranging between 73 to 219m. From a point near Luma-liha Island (8°27'S., 158°04'E.), the barrier reef and islands continue in a W direction, gradually decreas- ing the distance offshore, with numerous breaks in their contin- uity. There are numerous clear and deep passages through the steep-to fringing reefs as shown on the chart.

New Georgia

8.18 New Georgia is predominately mountainous. At its

NW end is a range of mountains with peaks rising to 914m or more. Mount Vina Roni, shaped somewhat like a reclining lion, stands 13 miles S of the N part of the island.

8.18

The NE coast of New Georgia continues with a chain of is-

lands that is an extension of those that shelter Marovo Lagoon. These islands are heavily wooded and are separated from each other by passages for small vessels. They have few landmarks. Hohopa Point (8°15'S., 157°49'E.), at the bend made by

8.18

Mondo Mondo Island, is a projection of the coastal reef. Ra- mata Island, about 10 miles NW of the point, is marked by a village near its NW end and by a house with a nearby old fort built on the summit of a 14m escarpment.

8.19 Lever Harbor (8°01'S., 157°35'E.) (World Port

Index No. 56965) is a small, but deep, inlet located about 7.5 miles SE of Visuvisu Point. The harbor, which is entered to the W of a 12m high, rocky point, offers shelter from all but N winds to vessels loading timber. A white beacon stands on the Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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