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Sector 7. The Solomon Islands—East Part

7.55

Winds—Weather.—From October to April, the winds are

from the N and W; at other times they are from the S and SE. The wharf is open to these winds, which can make berthing difficult.

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Depths—Limitations.—A wharf, about 53m in length, is

situated 0.25 mile W of Renard Sound’s S entrance point. Mooring dolphins stand E and W of the wharf, which has an alongside depth of 7.6m.

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Pilotage.—Pilotage is not compulsory, but is recommended,

and may be ordered through the Solomon Islands Ports Author- ity. The local authorities may be contacted through Honiara Radio.

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Directions.—Vessels approaching Renard Sound should

pass N and W of Koemurun Island, then W of Kokia Island, 2 miles to the SW.

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When approaching from the E, pass between Laumuan Is-

land and Lologhan Island, about 0.65 mile N, then between Fanau Island and Moe Island, then S and W of Daumie Island. When approaching from the NE, pass N of Oumala Island,

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then between Ufaon Island and Lamu Island, taking care to avoid the charted 3.1m reported pinnacle rock about 1.3 miles NW of Oumala Island.

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Vessels can also approach Renard Sound by passing between

Kakau Island and the charted shoals 0.5 mile and 1.25 miles, respectively, to the S of that island, then pass N and W of Ko- kia Island.

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When approaching from the S, enter between Louio Island

and Levelen Island, then keep in mid-channel between Mbani- kan Island and Loun Island.

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Caution.—It has been reported that the coral reefs on either

side of the approach channel to Renard Sound, and of the sound itself, are easily discernible by day and that the reefs extend 1m underwater from the shore and then drop almost perpendicular, so that the color of the water clearly indicates the channel with sufficient depth for navigation.

7.56 Sunlight Channel (Sera Me Ohol Channel), separating

the Pavuvu Islands and Mbanika Island, has a general width of 0.35 mile and depths of 33 to more than 183m. Moko Island divides the N part of the channel into two smaller channels. Hoi Island is in the S entrance; the passage to the W of the island is foul. A submarine cable is laid across Sunlight Chan- nel, about 1.4 miles N of Hoi Island. Mooring buoys are close N off Hoi Island. Areas in the channel which have been wire- dragged to 12.2m are shown on the chart.

7.56

Tides—Currents.—Tidal currents are negligible, except in

the S approach to Sunlight Channel E of Hoi Island, where a maximum of 2 knots has been observed and the average is 1 knot. Strengths occur at irregular intervals.

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Directions.—Sunlight Channel can be approached from the

NE or from the S by small vessels with local knowledge. The approach from the N is midway between Koemurun Island and Fulau Island, then midway between Fulau Island and Lever

7.57 Pipisala Bay (9°00'S., 159°08'E.) (World Port Index

No. 57030), at the N end of Pavuvu Island, affords good shel- tered anchorage, in 46m, about 0.2 mile from the shore reef ex- tending 0.25 mile from the head of the bay. Ships make occa- sional calls to load copra. Such ships must first call at a port of entry to obtain lighters and labor.

The inlet between Marulaon Island and Karamula Island has considerable depths, but affords no anchorage.

7.57 7.57

West Bay is an extensive bay off the NW coast of Pavuvu

Island. Macquitti Bay, the E arm of West Bay, has been wire- dragged as indicated on the chart. Anchorage can be taken in Anonyma Cove, at the head of that bay, in 33m, mud. The cove, 0.25 mile wide at the entrance, is fringed by a reef ex- tending 90m offshore.

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Hooper Bay, a S arm of West Bay, is reported to afford an-

chorage, in 18.3 to 42m, but the entrance is narrowed to about 0.15 mile by reefs extending from both sides of the entrance. There is a small pier on the W side of the bay, just inside the entrance.

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Buraku Island (Mborokua Island) (9°01'S., 158°45'E.), vol-

canic and 326m high, is 16 miles W of the Russell Islands. This isolated island resembles a truncated cone when seen from N. The island is heavily wooded and fringed with coral; breakers extend about 0.3 mile S from the SE and SW ex- tremities of the island. There is a bight off the SW side of the island where reefs extend nearly 0.1 mile offshore from the en- trance points.

Natives, who sometimes visit this uninhabited island, have reported no off-lying reefs.

7.57

209

Point, the N point of Mbanika Island, then passing W of Moko Island.

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One approach to the S entrance to Sunlight Passage is

between Taina Island and Menmui Point, the SW extremity of Mbanika Island; another approach is between Cape Mbaloka, the S extremity of Pavuvu Island, and Monoluon Island, an island 1.25 miles SW. Sand Island, in about the middle of the latter approach, may be passed on either side.

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A barrier reef with numerous islets 3.0 to 15.2m high and

covered with vegetation, is at the N side of Pavuvu Island. Langholon Island (8°59'S., 159°15'E.), marked by a light, is the E islet on this barrier reef.

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A large part of the area inside the barrier reef, including

Nono Bay and Pipisala Bay, two indentations on the N coast of Pavuvu Island, and yhe entrances into these bays have been wire-dragged and are shown on the chart.

Inside the barrier reef there are several coral reefs, some of considerable size, all of which are visible from aloft under fa- vorable conditions.

7.56 7.56

Nono Bay, on the NE side of Pavuvu Island, affords shel-

tered anchorage. The passages into the bay are partially marked by aids.

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