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Sector 7. The Solomon Islands—East Part

7.52 Hararo Point (9°01'S., 160°07'E.) almost 4 miles NE

of Tanavula Point, is the N point of a peninsula extending into the passage at about its midpoint.

7.52

Tanuli Point, the NE entrance point to Sandfly Passage, is

bare and the coast between it and Lark Point, about 1 mile SW, is fringed by a steep-to reef extending up to 0.1 mile offshore. The coast on the Mbokonimbeta Island side of Sandfly Pass-

7.52

age opens into Laitonga Bay, a large bight, close E of the SW extremity of Mbokonimbeta Island. The bay has depths of 55 to 73m, sand and coral, and an arm extending N has depths of 20.1 to 55m, mud.

7.52

Tides—Currents.—The strength of tidal currents is affected

by the prevailing winds and attain a rate of 2 to 3 knots at springs in the narrower channels. Strong tide rips are off both entrances and near the shores of the passages.

7.52

Anchorage.—Vessels with local knowledge can anchor, in

37 to 61m, sand and coral, anywhere in the passage out of the influence of the tidal currents. Vessels can anchor, as indicated on the chart, in 55 to 61m, sand and coral, about 0.4 mile NW of Mbiki Islet (9°00'S., 160°06'E.) in Laitonga Bay on the W side of the passage; and, in 48 to 55m, sand and coral, in Rod- erick Dhu Bay (9°00'S., 160°08'E.), on the E side of the pass- age.

7.52

Directions.—When tide rips in either entrance indicate

strong currents, close attention must be paid to steering be- cause there are many eddies due to the uneven bottom. Deep- draft vessels should not attempt the passage because of the reefs in the N entrance.

7.52

Vessels entering Sandfly Passage SW entrance should steer

for Haroro Hill (9°01'S., 160°07'E.), bearing 072°, which leads midway through the entrance. When past Rogers Rock (9°02'S., 160°04'E.), 24m high and lying close offshore 0.75 mile E of Tanavula Point, alter course to 057° with Hay Hill (9°00'S., 160°08'E.) ahead. This course leads nearly midway between Hararo Point and the shoals extending into the W side of the passage. When almost abeam of Hararo Point steer to pass W of Mid Reef and, when safely clear of it, alter course E to avoid Vatukulita Rocks and the other foul area off the NE side of Mbokonimbeta Island.

7.52 7.52

Haroro Hill is conspicuous when entering the passage. The main danger to vessels of moderate draft when entering

the N entrance to the passage is Mid Reef. but a mid-channel course leads almost 0.2 mile W of it.

7.52

Caution.—Mid Reef (9°00'S., 160°07'E.) is on a rocky

ridge nearly in mid-channel near the N entrance to Sandfly Passage. The ridge has uneven depths of 9.1 to 37m and the reef has depths of 3.6 to 5.5m. Overfalls and rips over the ridge are oc-casionally heavy.

7.52

A shoal, with a depth of 9m, is charted just W of the reef. 7.53 The coast of Nggela Sule from its E and Tana Tau

Point (9°08'S., 160°25'E.) to the entrance of Mboli Harbor, about 8 miles NW, should be approached with caution because of the many charted shoal areas offshore.

7.53

Laghale island (Legace Island) (9°05'S., 160°24'E.), 30m

high and fringed by a reef, is about 3.5 miles N of Tanatau Point.

7.53

Mboli Harbor, at the N entrance to Utaha Passage, affords

good shelter during SE winds in 14.6 to 16.5m, but during N or NE winds the anchorage is too exposed for large vessels. Small

Pub. 126

7.55 Yandina (9°05'S., 159°13'E.) (World Port Index No. 57070) is a copra and cocoa loading port.

vessels can anchor off the mission station on the E side of the harbor or farther S where there is complete shelter.

7.53

A drying reef with several islets extends 0.5 mile NW from

the E entrance of the harbor and two coral reefs with a foul area between them obstruct the seaward end of Utaha Passage; this limits the use of the passage to small vessels only. Range lights lead into Mboli Harbor.

7.53

Utaha Passage (Mboli Passage), dividing Nggela Sule into

two parts, is narrow and winding, especially at the N end, with heavy mangroves lining the entire passage. High heavily- wooded hills line the banks except at the N part where there are large grass-covered hills. There are many sand and coral shoals extending from the shores, and numerous streams, which muddy the water after heavy rains, empty into the passage. Tides—Currents.—Strong tidal currents with a rate of 3 to

7.53

4 knots in the N part form numerous rips and eddies at the sharp bends. Currents meet off a point on the W side of the S entrance to the passage.

7.53

Anchorage.—Vura Anchorage, on the W side of a peninsula

about 6 miles NW of Mboli Harbor, is apparently deep, with foul ground toward its head. Anuha Island is 0.5 mile N of the above peninsula with a deep channel between. Vatughahi Rocks (Vatugahi Rocks) with coconut palms on the reef fring- ing Anuha Island.

Anchorage can be taken, in 7.3 to 9.1m, on the bank 0.2 mile SW of the S end of Anuha Island.

7.53 7.53

Caution.—The coast between Vura Anchorage and Tanuli

Point, at the NE entrance to Sandfly Passage, is fringed by a reef extending about 0.2 mile offshore. There are several charted detached shoals off this part of the coast.

The Russell Islands

7.54 The Russell Islands, ranging 18 to 37 miles NW of

Guadalcanal Island, consist of Pavuvu Island, the smaller is- land of Mbanika Island, separated by Sunlight Channel, a deep passage, a large number of surrounding small islands which are steep-to and several charted shoals and reefs. Large coconut plantations are on the islands.

7.54

Pavuvu Island is mountainous with peaks up to 457m high

which slope down to level ground and form several peninsulas on the N side.

Mbanika Island has high ground up to 122m and level or undulating land elsewhere.

7.54 7.54

When approaching the Russell Islands, the mountains of

Pavuvu Island are the first highlands seen. The land blends with the horizon, and breakers are not seen before the land. The shore is made up of sandy beaches, with fringes of coconut palms in the background.

7.54

Depths in the approaches to the Russell Islands are generally

deep and clear, but caution is necessary in the SW approach because the islands there are not completely surveyed. Renard Sound (Kokolanohol Sound) (9°04'S., 159°14'E.),

7.54

on the NE side of Mbanika Island, has deep-water anchorage and is always sheltered. Much debris is reported on the bottom and caution should be taken to avoid fouling anchors. The bay serves as a port for Yandina Plantation. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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