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5.21

Sector 5. New Caledonia

Storm signals are displayed from the old signal station

mentioned above, and consist of the following: 1. Black ball—Port threatened by a storm with a mean

wind speed possibly reaching 33 knots or over, with an E component. 2. Two black balls—Port area threatened by a storm with

a mean wind speed reaching 33 knots or over, with a W component.

Anchorage

Mouillage de Ndie (22°15'N., 166°24'E.), on the N side of Presqu’ile Ducos, functions as the quarantine anchorage for the port. Anchorage may be had between Ilede Freycinet (22°14'S., 166°24'E.) and Ile Ndie, 0.8 mile NE of it, in depths of up to 16m, mud, clear of the foul ground 0.3 mile ENE of Ile Freycinet.

5.21 5.21

Outside the port, anchorage may be taken 1.5 miles N of Ile

de Freycinet, in a depth of 8m, mud, sheltered from all but SSW winds. Winds from the S and SE raise a chop here. An- chorage is also available S of Ile Nou, in depths of 9 to 20m, bottom quality not stated.

5.21

If approaching Petite Rade at night, temporary anchorage

may be had, in depths of 12.4m, bottom quality not stated, with the N end of Ilot Brun bearing 265°, 0.3 mile distant. Anchor- age may be had anywhere within Petite Rade, in depths of 8 to 13m, good holding ground, except within the charted prohib- ited anchorage areas, but anchorage berths here are assigned by the harbormaster.

5.21

Anchorage in Grande Rade is better than that available in

Petite Rade, and it also offers hurricane shelter. Caution is ad- vised, however, as the NE portion of the harbor is encumbered with coral heads. The bottom is foul with obstructions on the S side of Banc des Japonais.

Directions

5.21

See the descriptions for Canal de la Havannah (paragraph

5.8), Passe de Boulari (paragraph 5.17), Passe de Dumbea (paragraph 5.20), and Woodin Canal (paragraph 5.14) for directions and information on the approaches to Noumea.

Noumea to Baie de Saint Vincent

5.22 Baie Maa (22°13'S., 166°20'E.), which indents the W

side of the Maa Peninsula, affords anchorage sheltered against E winds. The bottom is sandy, but many coral heads exist, especially in the S part.

5.22

Port Laguerre, 2.5 miles NW of Baie Maa, is sheltered on its

W side by Ilot Te Ndu, and is open to the S. The NE arm of the bay is shallow and receives two rivers.

5.22

Mont Koui (22°08'S., 166°18'E.) 441m high, in line with the

W hill on the small peninsula just E of Port Laguerre, bearing about 354°, clears the shoal water extending WNW from the SW extremity of theMaa Peninsula.

5.22

Anchorage, protected from all but S winds, may be obtained

ENE of the N end of Ilot Te Ndu, in 8m, soft mud. 5.23 Port de Uitoe (22°06'S., 166°09'E.) is situated upon

the E side of Presqu’ile de Uitoe, a striking peninsula. Ile

Pub. 126

5.23

N’dukue and Ile Mathieu lies close SW of the peninsula. A reef projects 2.8 miles ESE from Ile N’dukue across the entrance of the port, upon which lie Ile Mbe, Ile Abu, and Ilot Moro. Recif No, easily seen at LW, lies about 1.8 miles SE of Ilot

Moro. Recif No is joined to Recif Mamaora, which projects about 0.6 mile SW from a point on the coast, about 1 mile E, by a shallow ridge. Recif Ti lies about 1 mile SW of Recif No. The SW side of Ile Abu, in line with the V formed by Pointe

5.23

Kauritio, the S end of Presqu’ile de Uitoe, and the N end of Ile N’dukue, bearing 308°, leads midway between Recif Ti and Recif No.

A patch, which dries, with a shoal having a depth of 3m close N, lies about 0.8 mile SW of Ilot Moro.

5.23 5.23

Vessels with local knowledge can obtain good anchorage in

Port de Uitoe, as charted, in depths of 7 to 11m, good holding ground. This anchorage is approached from either the S or W, rounding Ilot Moro at a safe distance.

5.23

Recif du Prony, which dries 1.5m in its E part, lies 2.25

miles SSW of Pointe Bovis (22°14'S., 166°21'E.), the S end of the Maa Peninsula. An islet, 1.3m high, lies on the W part of Recif du Prony. Basse Kaui, with a depth of 0.6m, lies 2 miles SW of Pointe Bovis. A reef, whose position is approximate, lies about 0.5 mile S of Basse Kaui.

Ilot Ndue and Ilot Ie, with Recif Ndaru and Recif Numbea between, lie upon a reef about 5 miles WNW of Pointe Bovis. Ilot Tangue (Ilot Iange) lies about 1.8 miles NNE of Ilot Ndue; the channel between is narrowed by shoals projecting from either side.

5.23 5.23

Ilot Mbo and Ilot Mba are wooded islets lying on the SW

side of the fairway between Port Noumea and Passe de Uitoe, about midway between Ilot Ndue and the barrier reef SW. In 1976, less water than charted was reported 2.3 miles NW of Ilot Mba.

5.23

Directions.—Vessels with local knowledge departing

Noumea from Grande Rade, round Ile Nou and set a course for Pointe Bovis (22°14'S., 166°21'E.). When in the vicinity of Pointe Bovis, about 0.5 mile off, steer 302° for Cap Ka, passing through the fairway between Ilot Ndue and Ilot Tangue (lot Iange), and between Recif Ti and Recif No, up to the entrance of Port Uitoe. Approaching Recif Ti, the vessel should follow the leading line described above and, if continuing to Baie de Saint Vincent, should adhere to this line until Cap Ka and the S end of Ile N’dukue comes into line bearing 298°. This alignment leads between Ilot Moro and the 1.5m patch 0.75 mile SW; when the buoy marking the patch is abeam, change course abruptly WSW for 0.6 mile until the SW end of Ile Hugon is in line with the NE end of Ilot Ronhua, bearing 300°. This course leads to the entrance of Passe du Cap Ka between Cap Ka and Pointe Guillois, the SE end of Ile Hugon (22°03'S., 166°03'E.).

5.24 Passe de Uitoe (22°10'S., 166°06'E.) entrance is

between the SE end of Recif Tetembia and the NW end of Recif de Annibal, is easily discernible, as the sea breaks over the reefs.

5.24

Aspect.—The main landmarks from the offing are Mont

Mou; Piton Karikate, and Titema Peak, 360m high, 2.5 miles ESE of Piton Karikate, all described in paragraph 5.20. From the passage, Cap Ka, a chain of wooded islets S of Port de Uitoe, Ilot Mba, and Ilot Mboa, are all good marks. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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