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5.16

Sector 5. New Caledonia

Baie de Mouea (22°18'S., 166°38'E.) is located about 4

miles NW of Baie Ngo. Anchorage is available, in a depth of 13m, with the S extremity of Ile Nde bearing 247°, 2.3 miles distant.

5.16

Baie de Boulari (22°16'S., 166°32'E.) affords anchorage in

one of the coves WNW of Mont Dore (Mount d’Or). Anchor also off the entrance to Anse du Charbon in the NE corner of Baie de Boulari, in 4 to 8m.

5.16

Baie de Magenta (22°17'S., 166°29'E.), about 3 miles WSW

of Baie de Boulari, is encumbered on its NE side by islets and reefs. The SW portion of the bay is clear as far in as the Magenta landing wharf on the SW side near the head, except for a 3.6m patch about 0.5 mile E of the dock. A channel dredged to depths of 7 to 10m, with diminishing depths, leads into and abreast the dock.

5.16

There exists a hazardous zone, 300m long and 50m wide,

around the extension to the airport runway. Surfing and surf- boarding are prohibited along the beach inside this zone, which is shown on the chart.

5.16

Port Ngea (22°18'S., 166°28'E.), situated about 2 miles

SSW of Baie Ouen, has irregular depths of 5 to 14m. Anchorage may be obtained in Port Ngea. There are several shoals entering and within the port. A shoal with a least depth of 2.8m extends up to 0.5 mile SSW of Ile Uere (Ile Ouere) (22°19'S., 166°28'E.).

5.16

Ilot Porc-Epic (22°20'S., 166°34'E.) is the outermost of a

group of islands on the E side of Baie de Boulari. It is rocky and the only one covered with fir trees. Anchorage may be taken either E or W of the islands.

5.16

Directions.—From the W end of Woodin Canal to Noumea,

follow the recommended track on a course of 277°, change course to 297.5° when the Ilot Porc-Epic Light is in line with the old signal tower in Noumea on this bearing. At night, this course is within the white sector of the light on Ilot Porc-Epic. When Ilot Porc-Epic is about 0.3 mile distant, alter course to 270°, passing E and N of several shoals best seen on the chart. When the range lights shown from Ile Nou are in line bearing 347°, steer for them.

Passages South and West of Noumea

5.17 Several passes lead through the barrier reef S and W

of Noumea. The main channels, which are marked, are Passe de Boulari and Passe de Dumbea.

5.17

Pilotage is compulsory for the following vessels within the

waters of New Caledonia: 1. All foreign vessels regardless of their length. 2. All French vessels more than 60m in length.

French warships are exempt, as well as pleasure craft less than 60m in length.

5.17 5.17

Masters of pleasure craft less than 60m in length are advised

to consider engaging the services of a pilot if unfamiliar with the area.

See the Noumea port description in paragraph 5.21 for de- tails on pilotage.

5.17 5.17

With the exception of vessels drawing less than 8m, and

carrying less than 8,000 tons of petroleum products, tank ves- sels must proceed to the Passe de Boulari pilot boarding ground to take a pilot. Vessels are required to remain at least 5

Pub. 126

miles off the reef while awaiting the pilot vessel, or in the ab- sence of reefs, 5 miles from the territorial waters of New Cale- donia.

5.17

Tank vessels drawing less than 10m and transporting less than

20,000 tons of petroleum products are permitted to transit Passe de Boulari. Vessels drawing more than 10m, and carrying more than 20,000 tons of petroleum products, are restricted to the transit of Passe de Dunbea, in daylight only.

5.17

Passe de Kuare (22°47'S., 166°45'E.) is about 20 miles S of

the S extremity of Ile Ouen. It lies between Neokouie and Neokumbi Reefs, and was the first practical passage about which anything was known. It has a depth of 20.5m. Passe de Uatio, 3.8 miles NW of Passe de Kuare, has a least charted depth of 34m. Passe de Mato, 5 miles NW of Passe de Uatio, has depths of 22.5m. These passages may be used only by ves- sels with local knowledge.

5.17

Passes de Boulari, entering the barrier reef between Grand

Recif Abore and Grand Recif Kue, is the main approach to Noumea from the S. The pass is divided into three entrance channels, described below in paragraph 5.18. All three chan- nels are easy to navigate, but Passe du Nord is generally used the most, although it is the narrowest and shallowest of the three.

5.18 Passe du Nord (Northern Passage) (22°30'S.,

166°26'E.) is 0.4 mile wide between Grand Recif Abore and Recif To, but the navigable width is reduced to 463m. Al- though this passage is the narrowest and shallowest of the pass- ages, it is preferred by the pilots because it can be navigated by all classes of vessels during the usual SE winds.

5.18

A conspicuous stranded wreck lies on the W side of Grand

Recif Abore, about 4.8 miles NW of the S extremity of the reef. It is reported to be an excellent visual and radar target. Passe Centrale (Central Passage) (22°31'S., 166°26'E.) is

5.18

about 0.9 mile between Recif To and Recif Le Sournois, 1 mile S. The fairway is deep, but its width has been reduced to about 0.6 mile by the banks on either side. The bottom can be seen in parts of the passage at a depth up to 23.8m. In transiting the passage, preference should be given the N side of the fairway. Passe du Sud (22°32'S., 166°26'E.), 0.5 mile wide between

5.18

Recif Le Sournois and Recif Toombo to the S, has depths of 24.9 to 43.8m.

5.18

Recif Toombo (22°33'S., 166°27'E.) is steep-to on its sea-

ward side. Its N end prolongs itself a short distance under water, but this prolongation should not be a danger, as the bot- tom can be seen at depths of 12.8 to 14.6m. A stranded wreck lies on the NW side of the reef.

5.18

Tides—Currents.—In Passes de Boulari, the ebb current

leaves with a considerable velocity; the flood enters with a more moderate velocity.

5.18

Aspect.—When a vessel is approaching from W, the high

land in the vicinity of Noumea will generally be seen. Mont Mou (22°04'S., 166°21'E.), 1,211m high with its two horns about 13 miles NNW of Noumea, and Mont Mone (22°10'S., 166°31'E.), 1,079m high, 7.5 miles NE of Noumea are visible, depending on the weather. Mont Dore (22°16'S., 166°35'E.) 772m high, lies about 7.8 miles E of Noumea and is separated from Mont Mone by a remarkable valley. It sometimes happens that although the horizon may appear to be moderately clear, the higher land of Mont Mou and Mont Dore may not be seen Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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