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134

Sector 5. New Caledonia

whole E side of New Caledonia (outside the reefs), and its influence is most felt at a distance from the shore. After several days continuance of a fresh SE wind, the strength of this cur- rent is considerably increased. With the wind at N or NW, the force of the current is diminished, or a countercurrent is estab- lished between Iles Loyaute and New Caledonia, running SE, and some days elapse after the cessation of the N wind before the normal NW current reappears.

5.1

The other branch of the great current passes to the S of Ile des

Pins (Kunie), turns to the W and the WSW, and is deflected to the S before reaching Australia. The W side of New Caledonia is somewhat protected causing weak eddies, which are variable both in force and direction, and are present dependent on the wind and the action of one of the currents which pass the island. The velocity of the tidal currents in Canal de la Havannah and

5.1

Passe de la Sarcelle is high, and the S subtropical current im- pinging on this area renders the currents in these passages the strongest and most irregular in the vicinity of New Caledonia. The S branch of the S subtropical current, after passing S of

5.1

Ile des Pins, is further deflected by the great S projection of the barrier reef, the S limit of which lies more than 35 miles S of the S extremity of New Caledonia.

5.1

Pilotage.—Pilotage is compulsory for the following vessels

within the waters of New Caledonia. 1. All foreign vessels regardless of their length. 2. All French vessels more than 60m in length.

French warships are exempt, as well as pleasure craft less than 60m in length.

5.1 5.1

Masters of pleasure craft less than 60m in length are advised

to consider engaging the services of a pilot if unfamiliar with the area.

Regulations.—Vessels arriving from an area infested by rhinoceros beetles are subject to quarantine inspection. The local authorities should be contacted in advance of arrival for details and requirements. Vessels carrying hydrocarbons are subject to special regulations. See Pub. 120, Sailing Directions (Planning Guide) Pacific Ocean and Southeast Asia for details. Trawling and dredging are prohibited in a 13,000 square

5.1 5.1

mile restriction zone located SE of the S end of New Cale- donia. This special protection zone is bounded by a line joining the following positions: a. 23°15.0'S, 167°00.0'E. b. 23°15.0'S, 169°00.0'E. c. 25°30.0'S, 169°00.0'E. d. 25°30.0'S, 167°00.0'E.

5.1

Caution.—Reports indicate that the set and drift of currents

in the vicinity of the barrier reef surrounding New Caledonia are unpredictable. Extreme caution should be used in nav- igating these waters, particularly in an area defined by the fol- lowing limits: 1. A line extended first in a 180° direction from the E

side of Passe de Boulari (Bulari Pass) for a distance of 35 miles; 2. then to position 23°30'00''S, 167°00'00''E. 3. then to position 23°15'00''S, 167°30'00''E. 4. then to position 22°56'18''S, 167°45'00''E. 5. A line extending to the E side of Ile des Pins.

5.1

The area between these limits and the barrier reef is ren-

dered extremely hazardous by unpredictable currents, and no vessel should enter it except in emergency.

Pub. 126

5.3 Ile Matthew (Matthew Island) (22°21'S., 171°21'E.)

is small in extent and consists of two parts joined by a low isthmus. The E part rises to a cone, 134m high, and the W part has the greater elevation of about 177m. On the S slopes of the W part of the island is a defined crater, from which sulphurous fumes were observed.

5.3

The shores of the island are free from known dangers except

to the N and the SE. There are shoals extending outward from these areas for several hundred meters. The area around Ile Matthew has been reported to be volcanically active. Light green patches caused by rust colored water upwelling and dispersing have been observed in the vicinity of the island. An area of dis- colored water, which was reported to be volcanically active, was reported to lie 9 miles W of the island.

5.1

The area between the barrier reef and the mainland has not

been closely sounded; therefore, vessels should navigate with caution.

5.1

Rocky patches, covered by depths of about 7.3m, can be seen

at a distance of 1 mile from an elevation of 24 to 30m; when close, the bottom can be seen in at least 18.3m. When there are passing clouds, the effect of light and shade on the water may be taken for the indication of a shoal, but the change of form and movement of a mere shade will soon become apparent. To have the sun ahead and at an altitude of less than 65° is one of the worst circumstances attending navigation within the reefs. When navigating within the reefs without a trustworthy pilot

5.1

or in unsettled weather, it will be prudent to make sure of reaching a convenient anchorage before nightfall or to stand out to sea through one of the passages during daylight. Though many vessels have anchored between the barrier reef

5.1

and the island without accident, it must be considered a dan- gerous thing to do, not only because of the risks normally in- herent in taking anchorage on rocky bottom, but because of the likelihood of sudden changes in winds and weather.

5.1

Areas dangerous due to mines laid during the WWII are in-

dicated in Pub. 120, Sailing Directions (Planning Guide) Pacif- ic Ocean and Southeast Asia.

Islands and Reefs East of Ile des Pins (Kunie)

5.2 Ceva-i-Ra Reef

(Theva-i-Ra Reef) (21°44'S.,

174°38'E.), called Conway Reef until 1976, extends about 1.6 miles in an E-W direction. The breakers on it are visible at a distance of 7 miles. On the middle of the reef is a sand cay, 1.8m high, 0.2 mile long, and 73m wide. A stranded wreck of a coaster lies 0.15 mile S of the center of the cay, and the wreck of a fishing vessel lies on the NE end of the reef.

5.2

Ile Hunter (Hunter Island) (22°24'S., 172°06'E.), a 296m

high volcanic block, has grassy slopes dotted with trees. Al- though the island is not an active volcano, it emits jets of sulphurous vapor. No detached dangers have been discovered off Ile Hunter, and it appears to be steep-to; depths of 73m having been obtained 90m offshore and 915m, 1 mile off. Tide rips extend for 2 miles from the NW side of the island,

5.2

and in places produce foam, which in sunlight has a greenish hue and resembles shallow water. The prevailing wind and current are reported to be from the SE. It may be possible under favorable circumstances to land on the N or NW side under the lee of some rocks. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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