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Sector 4. The Kiribati Islands to the Marshall Islands

4.67 Namu Atoll (7°45'N., 168°15'E.) lies about 25 miles

NW of Ailinglapalap Atoll and consists of over 50 small islets, most of which lie on the E side. Kaginen Island, located on the NE side of Namu Atoll, appears as three distinct islets when approaching from the N. Coconut palms and breadfruit trees grow on most of the islets. There is a trading station on Namu Island (8°12'N., 167°58'E.), at the N extremity of the island. Anil Channel (7°48'N., 168°12'E.) is narrow and divided

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into two channels, the S of which is only 90m wide. The channel should be used only by small vessels with local know- ledge, under favorable conditions of light.

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Bock Channel (8°03'N., 168°07'E.), about 135m wide and

deep in the fairway, leads into the lagoon from the northern- most entrance of the W side of the lagoon. The entrance channel is divided into two channels by a ridge of reefs. Bock Islet, 2.4m high, stands on the N side of the entrance. The approach to the channel should be made on a course of about 086°. The channel should only be entered under the most fa- vorable conditions of light. When within the entrance, vessels should alter the course to port and navigate (by sight) through the NW channel.

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Anchorage.—Anchorage can be taken by vessels with local

knowledge inside the lagoon off Leuen Island (7°45'N., 168°14'E.), in 27.4m, coral. There is little swell at this anchor- age, but it is exposed to NE winds. The best anchorage is off the house near the NW end of the island.

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Caution.—Great caution should be observed when passing

to leeward of the atoll because of a SE current. Breakers are rarely seen on the reefs on the lee side of the atoll, between the months of May and September.

There are scattered shoals in the lagoon. These can only be identified under favorable conditions of light.

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Lib Island (8°19'N., 167°24'E.), 34 miles WNW of Namu

Atoll, is about 0.8 mile in length and fringed by a steep-to reef which extends from 0.1 to 0.2 mile offshore. The edge of the reef is steep-to, and landing may be effected on its W side on a calm day at HW.

Kwajalein Atoll

4.68 Kwajalein Atoll (8°43'N., 167°44'E.), about 33 miles

NNW of Namu Atoll, consists of more than 90 islets and islands mostly covered with coconut palms from 17 to 29m high. They lie along the atoll reef which surround a lagoon that has an area of approximately 655 square miles. The reef is submerged for long stretches, especially on the SW side of the atoll. The S islands are covered with a dense growth of coconut palms and small vegetation. The islands to the N are mostly wooded.

Certain islands of Kwajalein Atoll are under military juris- diction and require special authorization for entry.

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Kwajalein Missile Range—Warning Area.—The waters

within a circular area with a radius of 200 miles, centered at position 8°43'N, 167°43'E, are so designated. Intermittent haz- ardous missile operations will be conducted within the area 24 hours, on a permanent basis.

Normally, operations in the Kwajalein Missile Range are covered by HYDROPAC messages.

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Regulations.—Full particulars dealing with entry applica-

tions to the Kwajalein Missile Range are contained within Title 32, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 525. These regulations apply to all persons, ships, and aircraft wishing entry to the Kwajalein Missile Range. The entry authorizations issued under the authority of these regulations do not apply to entry to any other areas of the Marshall Islands. In addition to the con- trols covered by this regulation, movement within the Missile Range, the territorial sea of, and airspace over it, is subject to the local control of the Commander, Kwajalein Missile Range. Kwajalein Missile Range is defined as all those defense sites

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in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, including airspace and adjacent territorial waters, to which the United States Gov- ernment has exclusive rights and entry control by agreement with the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

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In accordance with Title 19, Chapter 3, Section 101 of the

Code of Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, territorial waters mean "that part of the sea comprehended within the envelope of all arcs of circles having a radius of 3 miles drawn from all points of the barrier reef, fringing reef, or other reef system of the Trust Territory, measured from the low-water line, or, in the absence of such a reef system, the distance to be measured from the low-water line of any island, islet, reef, or rocks within the jurisdiction of the Trust Territory."

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Entry requirements are, as follows: 1. Ships or other marine vessels in the following cate-

gories, except those which have been denied entry or have had a prior entry authorization revoked, may enter the Kwa- jalein Missile Range territorial waters upon request to and approval of the Commander, Kwajalein Missile Range: a. U.S. private ships which are: (i) Under charter to the Military Sealift Command,

or (ii) Employed exclusively in support of and in con-

nection with a Department of Defense construction, maintenance, or repair contract on Kwajalein.

Pub. 126

121

Image courtesy of Capt. Richard Coxey

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