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104

Sector 4. The Kiribati Islands to the Marshall Islands

there is no shelter and the ocean swell tends to be more pro- nounced.

4.26 Nanumea (5°39'S., 176°08'E.), 37 miles NNW of

Nanumanga and the N atoll of the Tuvalu group, consists of a coral reef, with two principal islets, Lakina and Nanumea, about 0.5 mile within its W and SE extremities, respectively, with a lagoon between them. There is no channel for deep-draft vessels into the lagoon. A small boat channel, available to boats at HW, leads W of the W arm of Nanumea into the lagoon. There is a village on the W side of Nanumea with a conspicuous red-roofed church bearing between 020° and 120°, off which extends a broad fringing reef which rises as a wall of coral from the depths of the ocean. The sea breaks furiously on this reef, but at intervals the surf subsides to the extent that boats may land. Reefs extend off the SE point of Nanumea. It has been reported that a pier, 82m in length, extends from the village, and that two other piers exist in the lagoon.

4.26

Vessels approach Nanumea from the W and lie off this islet,

discharging cargo into landing craft. The bend in the atoll affords a slight lee off the NW arm of Nanumea. Large landing craft beach and unload on the reef; they should come in 3 hours before LW and can remain until 3 hours after LW. Engines should be kept running to keep the stern from swinging. Anchorage.—A vessel anchored off the NW point of Lakina

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on a submerged coral patch, about 0.3 mile off the dry fringe reef, in 12m. The anchor was dropped 0.5 mile from the NW tangent of Lakina, with the tree line bearing 145°.

4.26

Caution.—Vessels passing N or S of Nanumea should give

it a wide berth. The fringing coral reef is extremely hard and will break the back of any ship swept across it. The coral fingers extending from the reef also present a hazard.

The Gilbert Islands

4.27 The Gilbert Islands lie N of the Tuvalu group and ex-

tend from 2°45'S to 3°30'N, and between 172°30'E and 177°00'E. Some of these islands are incorrectly placed on the chart, particularly as to longitude. Those islands of the Gilbert group that lie N of the Equator are known as the North Gilbert Islands; those S of the Equator are known as the South Gilbert Islands.

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The E side of these islands are steep-to and may be passed at

0.5 to 1 mile off. The W side are fronted by sunken reefs, spits, and coral patches which in some cases extend many miles off. It is advisable to pass E of the islands, but care must be taken not to be set too close inshore by the prevailing E wind and the South Equatorial Current, which generally sets W. Vessels are urged to contact the Marine Superintendent at Beito, Tarawa for the latest navigational information on buoys, beacons, etc., before entering or approaching.

4.27

Tides—Currents.—The islands in this group are almost

always influenced by the South Equatorial Current, which sets to the W at rates of 1.5 to 2 knots. Persistent W winds, which may occur from December to April, or a S shift of the South Equatorial Countercurrent may cause an E set.

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Caution.—Fish Aggregating Devices (FADS) have been

placed within the waters of the Gilbert Islands in the following approximate positions:

Pub. 126

4.30 Onotoa (1°51'S., 175°35'E.) lies about 41 miles NW of Tamana and has a shallow lagoon bordered by a broken reef

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a. 3°08.1'N, 172°41.2'E. b. 1°23.2'N, 173°10.6'E. c. 1°10.0'N, 173°01.0'E.

FADS are usually moored in deep water locations; they may

be lit or unlit, and concentration of fishing vessels may be encountered in the vicinity. FADS are not an aid to navigation nor are they maintained as such; they are subject to break loose from their mooring grounds.

4.27

In 1983, breakers and discolored water reported in position

3°53'S, 174°02'E and position 2°21'S, 175°19'E. 4.28 Arorae (2°39'S., 176°50'E.), the SE island of the

Gilbert Islands, lies about 185 miles NNE of Nanumea, in the Tuvalu group; it is densely wooded and about 15m high to the tops of the trees.

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A reef, which always breaks heavily, extends 0.3 mile S

from the island. A coral and sand reef, with depths of 3.6 to 7.3m, extends about 2 miles from the NW point of the island. On the latter reef, which is dangerous, a heavy ground swell usually runs and occasionally breaks heavily at more than 1 mile offshore.

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There is a concrete church on the island, but it is obscured by

trees from the N and S. The flagstaff at the government station shows above the trees midway along the W side. The island is best approached from the W, steering for the flagstaff. Anchorage.—The best anchorage is on the W side of the

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island, immediately in front of the church. It has no swinging room and is practicable only when there are N and S winds. A vessel found an anchorage (1949), in 23.8m, with the flag-

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staff bearing 001° and the N of four coconut palms, painted white, on the foreshore, bearing 067.5°.

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Directions.—Landing is accomplished from canoes at the

beach in an area, to the W of the flagpole, where all projecting coral heads have been cleared for a distance of about 0.2 mile. The reef extends out for about 0.2 mile in the area.

4.29 Tamana (2°29'S., 175°54'E.), located about 50 miles

W of Arorae, is densely covered with coconut trees and is fringed by a coastal reef about 0.2 mile wide. There are no nav- igational marks on the island, except for a conspicuous white church and a flagstaff about 90m SE of it. The church is situ- ated about midway along the SW side of the island, close to the beach. An administration building stands close S of the church. There are no anchorages off the island, except for small ves- sels with local knowledge.

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There are depths of over 200m about 0.1 mile from the

breakers, except at the N and S extremities of the island, where the slope of the seabed is less steep.

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A boat channel, suitable only for canoes or surfboats, has

been blasted through the reef opposite the flagstaff. The chan- nel, which is about 4.8m wide, is approached with the flagstaff bearing 041°.

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Caution.—Off-lying banks, with depths of 92 to 366m, lies

in approximate position 3°01'30''S, 175°41'12''E, about 35 miles SW of Tamana. In 1983, a vessel reported breakers in ap- proximate position 3°53.0'S, 174°02.5'E and approximate posi- tion 2°21'S, 175°19'E. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310
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