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List of typical threshold levels of energy consum- ption that trigger man- adatory energy efficiency plans in existing non- residential buildings.

IEE [kgoe/m2.ano]

Hypermarkets Retail shops Supermarket

Shopping centers Small shops Restaurants Bakers

Fast Food

Hotel 4 or more stars Hotel 3 or less stars Cinema and theatre Discos

Bingo and social clubs Sport club with pool Sport club without pool Offices

Bank and insurance headquarters

Bank and insurance agencies

Communications Libraries

Museums and galleries Courthouses Prisons Schools Hospitals

255 45

150 190 75

170 265 210 60 35 25 55 45 35 25 40

70 60

40 20 10 10 20 15 40

systems components (non-residential buildings).

The proof of compliance must be made at two stages: › when requesting the building permit; › and after completion of the building.

Control of the regulation is the responsibility of the Municipality where the building is located, based on a Declaration of Compliance with the building regulations issued by an accredited expert registered in the SCE (Building Certification System).

Requirements for existing non-residential buildings larger than 1000 m2

If the primary energy consumption of an existing building, based on actual fuel bills and covering all types of energy usage, exceeds a certain level fixed by the HVAC regulations, an energy efficiency plan must be prepared and all measures with payback shorter than 8 years must be implemented over a three year period. This threshold level corresponds to the currently 40% worst performers of their typology, as determined by extensive building energy consumption surveys ordered by the national government in preparation of the new regulations, This threshold level that triggers an energy efficiency plan should be regularly reduced over the years, to include an increasing number of buildings.

This requirement does not apply to smaller non-residential buildings or to any residential building.

Public Buildings – periodic certification

In Portugal, the definition of public building includes every non-residential building, owned by private or government bodies. Every non-residential building larger than 1000 m2 shall be required to prominently display an energy certificate at the main entrance.

Example: distribution of hotel energy consumption.

12

Percent 25% = 57,6 Median = 123,2

10 8 6

Qualified Experts

4 2 0

Qualified experts are the only persons permitted to issue Certificates and carry out inspections. They must be recognised architects or engineers with at least five years’ experience, on the basis of peer-analysis of their CVs carried out by elected boards by their professional associations. In addition, qualified experts must attend recognized courses and pass a demanding national examination that evaluates their knowledge about the technical requirements of the building regulations and the details of the certification system itself.

IEE [kgoe/m2.ano]

Note:"kgoe - kg of oil equivalent"

ADENE co-ordinates the training of qualified experts and is responsible for the Energy Certification module in all courses. These courses are available in the three areas covered by the system and award different qualifications: RCCTE (residential and small non-residential) and RSECE (large non-residential). For the large non-residential buildings, experts can be qualified in one or two areas: Energy and Indoor Air Quality (RSECE-E

EPBD Buildings Platform > P061_EN_Portugal_March08

Page 172

4

Percent 75% = 169,4 Sample = 40

Certificates are based on calculated energy ratings, and must be periodically renewed once every 6 years. Indoor Air quality certificates must be renewed every two or three years, depending on building typology.

Certificates must include a list of recommended energy improvement measures based on actual consumption (energy bills). A detailed energy and indoor air quality audit is thus required periodically. When the actual energy consumption is above a certain threshold, an energy plan is required (see previous section).

0-50 50-100

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