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LIFESTYLE: Eco Friendly Gardening – Slug Control

by Nicola Mesham of http://www.pouchbags.co.uk

Spring is the time gardens come back to life and thoughts turn to getting the gardening season underway. Spring also marks the return of the gardener’s nemesis – slugs and snails!

It is not uncommon for a whole crop to be eaten down to a few stumps in a matter of hours, usually overnight. Traditionally, people would combat them with tiny blue pellets designed to poison the slugs. The problem is, wildlife, such as hedgehogs and birds, may also be harmed by eating the poisoned slugs. These days, most gardeners prefer to wage war on this slimy enemy by using organic methods. The following are some chemical-free ideas to help you ward off those pesky pests!

50 | ukhandmade | Spring 2010

Barriers:

A number of different materials can be used to surround plants to help with deterring slugs. Most work by making it difficult for slugs to get across, either through being scratchy and sharp or by drying up the mucous glands which help them move. Unfortunately, barriers can often suffer damage from the wind and rain, so you do need to keep an eye on them after a bout of bad weather.

Barriers to try include:

Crushed sea shells, sharp sand (available from DIY stores), raw oats (slugs eat the oats, then swell up and die), crushed egg shells, dried sheep’s wool (available in pellet form), garlic water sprayed on the soil and more bizarrely, hair clippings - slugs hate them apparently!

Other barriers include:

Copper tape placed around the body of a plant pot, Vaseline smeared around the rim of pots, doughnut- shaped collars cut from sandpaper and placed around young seedlings, plastic collars made from clear plastic bottles with the top and bottom cut off to form a cylinder.

Traps:

Slugs and snails can be enticed into traps where they drown, unfortunate for them, but probably a better way to go than poisoning! A selection of smooth glass or plastic containers, sunk into the soil and filled with beer or milk, make an alluring trap for slugs. Again you need to keep an eye on them after a rainstorm and the liquid must be replenished every few days. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98
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