This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Indian national with Bangladeshi passport
Spice Business has come to know of a number of chefs and
cooks holding Bangladeshi passports but of Indian origin
working in some Indian restaurants in UK. Some of them
have come here under the sector-based scheme with work
permits. A number of them have obtained ‘indefinite leave
to remain in UK’ visas by showing forged English language
certificates and other documents as well, though in fact
they do not know English.
When contacted the Bangladesh High Commission said
they are investigating the cases. All papers and documents
should be thoroughly checked by the UK Border Agency
before giving indefinite stay status or British passports.
Birmingham’s Balti Triangle
now Britain’s Curry Capital
Birmingham, Britain’s second most
of Hall Green originated in 1889 and thanks from Prince Charles and Diana,
important city after London, has a
were a favourite dish of the late Queen Princess of Wales, after they were sent
reputation for good food. It stages the
Mother. Lashford’s received a letter of sausages as a wedding gift.
BBC Good Food Show at the National
Exhibition Centre, Britain’s biggest
food event. It has also come to be
known as the Curry Capital of the UK.
The famous Balti Triangle derives
from the Hindi word Balti, a spicy, aro-
matic Kashmiri dish (it is a misnomer
though because the literal meaning of
balti is bucket). There are more than
100 balti houses which attract 20,000
visitors a week. Birmingham’s ‘Balti
Triangle’ - an area around Sparkbrook,
Balsall Heath and Moseley has about
50 restaurants.
The Indian restaurants are just part of
more than 200 restaurants in the city
centre that serve food from 27 coun-
tries, from Europe and the East, to the
Caribbean and the Americas.
Birmingham is also home to the canal-
boat restaurant away2dine, where
diners can have a five-course meal
during a three-hour cruise of the city’s
canals.
George Cadbury began making choco-
late in Birmingham in 1824. At that
time it was considered an aphrodisiac
and therefore not suitable for a lady.
The city still produces some of UK’s
leading food and drink products.
Lashford’s award-winning sausages
Spice Business Magazine 37 February | March 2010
spice_37.indd 37 11/02/2010 00:09
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com