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036 INTERVIEW / ROGIER VAN DER HEIDE
Any projects you would like to change?
I would love to change the yellow lighting in European
cityscapes for the white urban lighting that is common in
Japan.
Projects you dislike?
I dislike any lighting that does not take people seriously.
Projects you admire?
I admire simple, poetic and playful lighting. I think Charles
Stone’s Hayden Planetarium in New York City is awesome.
I like our own Star Place for which I did the facade lighting
with Ben van Berkel. It’s like he says: “made in heaven”. I
still admire the Wellcome Wing at the Science Museum.
There, I worked closely with Sir Richard MacCormac, who
has a wonderful vision on light and space and insists on
pursuing that. Tim Molloy of the museum was a very cool
client, too.
Lighting hero?
I am more and more inspired by things outside lighting
such as materials, space, and behaviour of people. What
also inspires is the notion that you can contribute to the
world beyond your own. And my muse... is the woman I
love!
© Zaha Hadid ArchitectsNotable projects?
• Of course, Galleria West in Seoul, with UNStudio, a
milestone project in the world of dynamic architectural
lighting • And the Wellcome Wing at the Science
Museum, that I like to call The Big Blue Space • Also,
Zaha Hadid’s Mind Zone at the Millennium Dome, where I
fused light and materials, and spatial perception • And the
California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco • Many
of my colleagues worked on it too, but I am particularly
proud of the fundamental research I did together with
Simone Collon and Tom Hennes of THinc Design on the
lighting for live coral reefs.
Current projects?
• The Sheikh Zayed Bridge in Abu Dhabi, with Zaha Hadid
(pictured) • The library and the Headquarter Building
of Education City in Qatar, with OMA / Rem Koolhaas •
The Louis Vuitton Flagship Store in London’s New Bond
Street (pictured), with Peter Marino of New York City •
The Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum (National Museum of
Modern Art), that is going to be gorgeous, with architect
Mels Crouwel.
www.arup.com/lighting
To create bonds between people, places and one issue today, his opinion is clear: main-
products, he forgoes the use of complicated tenance considerations, energy consump-
designs with lots of colours and different tion and ways of minimizing light pollution
lighting effects. “I try to come up with should be fully integrated into a project.
meaningful concepts,” he says, “and then “They should not even be any more in brief-
I try to find the most simple way to tell ings,” he says. “That just speaks for itself.”
them.” Lighting can “improve the well- In terms of sustainability, lighting can affect
being of people,” he says. “It can create a building’s longevity. If you make it charis-
something memorable. You go to a place. It matic and irreplaceable, it’s less likely to be
could be a piazza that is beautifully lit. And torn down in ten years.
you take home the memory of it. It becomes Green-minded to the point that his house
unforgettable. That is priceless.” runs on wind power, van der Heide also
As for the business side of things, van der donates to a rainforest carbon offset pro-
Heide believes lighting design is a “strate- gramme to make up for gas bought through
gic aspect for the client in their business”. the traditional supply network.
Lighting does more than just enhance the With so much more yet to discover about
architecture, it can have “a huge impact on the way lighting affects people’s health and
the commercial success of the building,” he well-being, van der Heide the humanist is
says, citing the Galleria West shopping cen- busy working at the forefront of lighting to
tre designed by UNStudio and Arup in Seoul understand how we can benefit from it now
as an example. and in the future. And in the process, he’ll
On the matter of sustainability, the number make a memory of it, too.
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