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in 11 Caribbean countries by the Caribbean
Coalition of National AIDS Programme
Coordinators (CCNAPC), under the Global
Fund, to receive and respond to complaints
pertaining to human rights violations to
PLWHA through the appropriate and
relevant authorities.
Some of the most important social,
economic and cultural human rights which
are relevant in the context of HIV/AIDS
include:
(i) The right to health
(ii) The right to work
(iii) The right to education
(iv) The right to an adequate standard
of living and social security
(v) The right to privacy
Human Rights Desk
HHH
SIDEBAR:
What is HIV?
The Human Immuno-deficiency Virus
causes the immune system to lack the
required elements to function properly.
The germ (micro-organism) responsible for
the infection can only affect humans. It is
extremely small and can only survive and
multiply within living cells, at the expense of
these cells.
What is AIDS?
AIDS stands for Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome, and is caused by the
HIV virus, meaning that it is a virus that a
person contracts as opposed to a condition
that is hereditary (passed on through genes).
Your immune system is the part of the
body that protects you from germs, viruses
• Help to represent workers with AIDS-
to be established or extended appropriately
and bacteria, and so keeps you healthy.
related illnesses to access reasonable
to include a range of services for workers as
AIDS creates a deficiency, or weakness
accommodation when so requested.
members of families, and to support their
in your immune system, causing it to
• Ensure that any information that is
family members. This could be done in
malfunction. A wide range of different
acquired about workers with HIV/AIDS in
collaboration with government and other
diseases, conditions and opportunistic
the course of performing their representative
relevant stakeholders in accordance with
infections can affect someone with AIDS.
functions is kept confidential.
resources and needs, as laid out in the UN

• Ensure that any HIV/AIDS-related
charter, to which Antigua and Barbuda,
How is it spread?
information is kept/maintained under
Guyana, Jamaica and other OECS territories
The main routes of HIV transmission are:
conditions of strictest confidence, as with
are all signatories.
• Unprotected sexual contract with an
other medical data pertaining to workers,
A Human Rights Desk does exist in
infected person
and disclosed only in accordance with the
Antigua. This was set up to respond to
• Sharing needles with an infected person
ILO code of practice on the protection of
human rights violations against persons
• From an infected mother to child during
workers’ personal data.
living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) in
pregnancy, birth, or shortly after birth while
breastfeeding
It is advisable that individual enterprises
Antigua and Barbuda, and is currently
establish their policy guidelines, which
exploring relationships with the Ministry
It is not spread by:
should apply to all workers.
of Justice and Legal Affairs. Further, there
Kissing, holding hands, sharing food, or
is an ombudsman, to whom violations of
mosquito bites
In light of the nature of the epidemic,
Human Rights may be reported. Human
employee assistance programmes may need
Rights Desks are currently being introduced
BusinessFocus • August/September 2008 | 13
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