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SURVIVORS: SOPWITH CAMEL BRITAIN AT WAR
(With the kind permission of
(With the kind permission of Ron Campbell, flickr.com/photos/rondeeview) Danny McLaughlin, www.flickr.com/photos/dmcl)
B7280
(With
the k
ind p
ermi
ssion
of Ja
ck C
iesla
wski
)
The last in a batch of 100 Sopwith
Camel F1s built by Clayton &
Shuttleworth Ltd., whose head
office was located in Lincoln,
B7280 was shot down on 5
September 1918. The victor was Lt.
Beckmann of Jasta 56; the
vanquished was 210 Squadron’s
Captain Herbert A. Patey DFC.
Patey was able to make a crash-
landing behind the German front-
line in Belgium and was taken
prisoner.
The landing must have been a good
one, for the aircraft was recovered
by the Germans and, once repaired,
returned to the air. It is believed to
have been flown until the end of the
war, after which it was taken to
Berlin and exhibited in a museum.
By the time he was shot down,
Patey, who had served at Gallipoli
in the Howe Battalion Royal Naval
Division before transferring to the
RNAS, was classed as a ‘Camel
Ace’. His tally, gained during his
time with Nos. 10 (Naval) and 210
Squadrons, stood at eleven (some
accounts give this figure as nine),
including one balloon. Perhaps as
t
P
ate)
he result of his time as prisoner of
war, Patey did not survive long
a
Roger
fter the Armistice. He died on 18
F
of
ebruary 1919, from double
pneumonia at his home in West
Hampstead. He was just twenty
years old.
permission
During the Second World War,
B
kind
7280 was moved to Poland. Today
i
the
t is housed in the Polish Aviation
Museum at Kraków. The Museum
c
(With
ontains an impressive selection of
original First World War aircraft,
unfortunately mostly without wings.
In the picture on the right we can
see, from left to right, a Halberstadt
CLII, a LFG Roland DV1b, DFW
CV.C, Aviatik C.III, Albatross C.1,
the Sopwith Camel, and Albatross
H.1. A truly impressive line up! (With the kind permission of Mick Bajcar)
72
MARCH 2009
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