This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
50 April 17, 2014


Galway gallop T


Nunnink and R-Star finished


fast enough to defeat John Michael Durr on Esprit De La Danse (58.4) and Hawley Bennett-Awad on Gin ’N Juice (60.3). Durr, of Woodside, finished the


cross-country course two seconds slow to climb from third place, while Bennett-Awad, a Canadian Olympic veteran who lives in Temecula, recorded one of the only two fault-free cross-country rounds to climb from fifth place. “Usually I kind of start off a bit


slow, but today I went fast enough early that I could take time to set her up for the last two combina- tions,” said Nunnink, of Auburn. “I think that was the best round I’ve ever had on her. I was very happy with her ability to go forward and come back to me.” Nunnink, 52, didn’t let her bro-


After leading through two phases, Kristi Nunnink and R-Star galloped through the cross country to win the CIC3* at Galway Downs, held March 28-30.


“Every doctor I saw had worse news, so I fi nally stopped going and then just cut the cast off.”


—Kristi Nunnink on her broken thumb


ken right thumb slow her down. She’d fractured her thumb two weeks before Galway Downs while dragging in her ringóthe tractor’s front tires got stuck in the arena footing and then suddenly came loose, roughly spinning the wheel with her thumb stuck in it. The first doctor she saw told her she shouldn’t ride for five to six weeks, so she went to another doctor. “Every doctor I saw had worse


news, so I finally stopped going and then just cut the cast off,” Nunnink said. “I could feel it on the drops, but otherwise I was fine in my own little zone.” With first place in the CIC3*


worth $2,500, show jumping course


Auburn’s Kristi Nunnick and R-Star race to exciting, close CIC3* victory from releases and staff reports


EMECULA—After taking the two-phase lead in the CIC3* at the Galway Downs


International Horse Trials, Kristi Nunnink said that she planned to gallop fast enough around the cross-country course to win, and she did just that. She rode R-Star across the finish line 14 seconds slow, and those 5.6 time faults kept her just in front, with a total score of 57.5.


designer Sarah Dubost set a track with a very tight optimum time. Nunnink was one of only three rid- ers to finish without time faults (but with one rail down for four faults), while the other 12 finishers record- ed between two and 13 time faults. No horses finished with both zero jumping and zero time faults. Goodknight and Jolie


Wentworth lowered one rail for four faults and added four time faults to hold second after two phases. Esprit De La Danse finished three seconds inside the time to avoid time faults but lowered one fence along the way. Gin ’N Juice and Bennett-Awad, the 2013 Galway Downs CIC3* winners, also finished inside the optimum time but lowered one rail, to jump from 10th to fifth. Nunnink said she suspected the time would be tight because she’d heard other riders talking about making tight turns. But she also had the advantage of being the sec- ond-last starter, thus knowing how important time faults had become. “So I tried to shave time off every


turn, and I could do that with her because she jumps anything in front of her,” said Nunnink. Since she held a lead of 5.7 points after show jump- ing, Nunnink would have had to finish 15 seconds slow on Saturday’s cross-country course for Wentworth to overtake her. She finished 14 seconds slow, and Wentworth have her more room by not starting GoodKnight, saying she didn’t think he needed another cross-country run before their next start, the Rolex Kentucky Three- Day Event on April 24-27. Nunnink was ecstatic about her


round on the gray Holsteiner mare, by Riverman, whom she’s competed since 2006. “It really is almost euphoric every


day that I ride her, because she does everything to so well. Although time faults were far less decisive in the CIC2* show jump-


Sherry Stewart photo


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92