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Q&A DALE GIBSON


Sunland horseman Dale Gibson has a trail of equestrian contributions behind him—and a challenge ahead of him on March 7: to get elected to the L.A. City Council.


HT: Dale, are there any similarities in the


roles of a movie stunt rider and a candidate for L.A. City Council? DG: Being on budget and being on time


are the most important things dealing with the city and, especially, on set. In either place, if you get known for being undepend- able, a big spender and never on time, you are not going to be very popular.


HT: It’s been pointed out that “stunt man” is just one item on your resume. You’ve been President of your local Neighborhood Council that works closely with the Los Angeles City Council on neighborhood issues, you are the current President of the Equine Advisory Board, working closely the last seven years with the L.A. City Council on equestrian issues. And, you’re a business- man in L.A. going on 18 years now. DG: For the neighborhoods, I’d like to


strengthen the Neighborhood Council’s voice, which is more in tune with local issues. As for horses, L.A. is second only to Texas with the number of horses, a big


economic business for L.A. I’d also like to see more fi lming brought back to L.A. Many jobs and tax revenue was lost to other states when L.A. took away tax incentives to fi lm- ing.


HT: You have been working to make a


diff erence for years—ranging from your water reclamation project to leading the L.A. Equine Advisory Council. What’s your message to horse people as far as get ing involved in their communities? DG: United we stand, divided we fall. My


message is to stand together—yes, it’s the mot o of Kentucky, where I’m from. But most equestrians want to go ride and be leſt alone. I tell horse people and non-equestri- an voters in this District that we REALLY need to stand together. One person rarely makes a big diff erence, but a community that stands together can make great things happen. Horse people are very independent, self-suffi cient folks, but a loner can easily be picked off by wolves and there are lots of wolves out there. The other thing is, stand


for your community. We have fi ve acres here. Many developers have tried to buy this place with big checks, but I couldn’t live with myself if I sold out. If I sell, it will be to another horse owner.


HT: What are the pressures horse commu- nities face? DB: A realtor told me a long time ago, “we


fi ght and we fi ght, and one day we win.” And that’s how our ranchlands disappear, to developers who have a lot of money. But once the lifestyle is gone, it’s gone forever.


HT: Diff erent types of horsepeople bring


diff erent strengths to the community. What are some of the ways horsepeople can get involved that maybe they haven’t thought of before? DG: First, just stand together. Our Los


Angeles Equine Advisory Commit ee (LAEAC) has such a diverse group sit ing on the board, but we are all horse-lovers. That common thread is enough to keep us


Continued on page 42


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