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FOCUS ON Hoof Health FARRIER from page 21:


was anticipating it.” In situations in


which a horse might be anticipating a bad nailing experience, Koons tries to be gentle with the ham- mer.


“I watch a lot of


Koons uses concave for about 96% of the shoes he applies. “Concave is the best option for most feet,” he says. “It’s not too much traction, it’s adequate traction for what the horse needs.”


was weak, soſt and crumbly. I was already calling him a gentle giant, because he stood perfectly through the trim. It was the first nail, so I put it in the most solid place I could find, and he explod- ed on the first tap of the nail and about flipped over. It was quite the reaction to a tap of the hammer. There’s no way it went in deep enough with one tap. He


young, inexperi- enced farriers who are hiting the nails as hard as they can,” he says. “You can hear the hammer ring with every blow.


As I start nailing, I’m making sure it feels solid and also feeling for the horse to have any sort of reaction toward it before I drive the nail home.” Koons also will drive just


enough nails to hold the shoe in place and then switch to another foot.


Max arrived at the facility lame with a possible soſt tissue


injury. The shoe was set far back in the toe, which was leſt long. The shoe wasn’t covering the quarters and there was a lot of heel hanging out of the back. The horse’s vet anticipated


that a month of rest would do the trick. No shoes were neces- sary. Aſter a month, there was no change. “His feet were falling apart,”


Koons says as he cleans out the leſt front foot. “This foot had massive thrush. The right front was still lame. I was finally given the go-ahead to shoe him.” In just 2 weeks, Max showed


dramatic improvement with a shoeing package consisting of concave shoes, a Castle Plastics Cushion Frog Pad, impression


FARRIER TAKEAWAYS


• Good, solid, basic horseshoeing helps the horse more in therapeutic situations.


• Determining the shoeing schedule for your clients will help prevent lame horses.


• Just remove what’s necessary for hygiene, balance and integrity when trimming feet.


material impregnated with cop- per sulfate crystals that covered two-thirds of the foot and RATE Hoof Packing in the toe. “He was almost completely


sound,” Koons says. Now at 7 weeks, Max’s feet are


much stronger despite being on irrigated grass the whole time. “That’s nice,” he says as pares


the frog and sole. “That was all sensitive tissue last time. It’s solid.”


This article reprinted with permission from


www.americanfarriers.com


WARNING-SIGNS OF “Sulcus” THRUSH


1. Does your horse have a “Heel Crack?” 2. Has your horse been Under-performing? 3. Are the heels SOFT, or even squishy?


Sulcus Thrush


BEFORE


No Thrush is Not Caustic. No Stains. Just Dust On.


-


AFTER


Available Everywhere www.NoThrushShop.com


Yes,Yes, It’s a Powder


921960-1906A





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