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ATX West/MDM Product Preview


VOLUME 30 - NUMBER 12


Enclosures and Other Products


Wall-Mount THE GLOBAL HI-TECH ELECTRONICS PUBLICATION December, 2015


Safer Radar to Protect Next Generation Warships


By David Rizzo T


Stainless steel wall-mount en- closures from Hammond are standouts in this month's EM Products section, starting on. . .


Page 24


AOI Is King at General


Microcircuits


General Microcircuits, Inc., in Mooresville, NC continually launches new products, sup- porting the entire process from concept through produc- tion, and serving the indus- trial, commercial, telecom- munications, medical, and defense markets. The compa- ny relies on its Nordson YESTECH AOI systems.


Page 20


This Month's Focus: Components


and Distribution


Miniaturization of electronic components; the importance of reducing video latency; making precision low-value resistance measurements; in- terconnector solutions for maximum reliability; power supply selection goes deeper than comparing specs....


Page 48


he military uses radar for many purposes, including guid- ing missiles to targets, direct-


ing the firing of weapon systems, and providing long-distance surveillance and navigation information. Howev- er, for the next generation of systems currently in development, the most


critical requirement is the ability to successfully counter saturation at- tacks. Such attacks may include nu- merous aircraft and missiles con- verging from multiple directions at the same time. To meet this challenge, very


high data rates are required to track a large number of simultaneous tar-


gets. Unfortunately, the level of data quality required is not achievable with the traditional rotating or fixed radar systems in use today.


Mechanical Rotation Radar systems are often identi-


fied by type of scanning. The most common, mechanical scanning, in- volves the rotation of a parabolic dish or antenna through a 360° sweep of the horizon. As it rotates, pulses of radio waves or microwaves are trans- mitted and bounce off any object in its path. The object returns a tiny part of the wave’s energy. These systems are not without


limitations, however, providing only limited tracking capabilities. Upon detecting a potential target, the radar typically waits a second or two for an additional sweep return so that it can correlate the two echoes, extract course and speed information and start a new tracking process. De- pending on the sweep rate, this wastes valuable time against an in-


Continued on page 8


Typical conventional radar mounted atop anti-aircraft guns, are limited in their usefulness, especially when dozens of threats are incoming from all directions.


Big Data Regional Hub Coming to Georgia Tech and UNC


Atlanta, GA and Chapel Hill, NC — The Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of North Caroli- na’s Renaissance Computing Insti- tute (RENCI) will co-direct a new, national effort to develop a Big Data Regional Innovation Hub serving 16 Southern states and the District of Columbia.


The South Big Data Regional


Innovation Hub (South BD Hub) — to be managed jointly by Georgia Tech and UNC-Chapel Hill — is part of the National Science Foundation’s four Big Data Regional Innovation Hubs (BD Hubs). The new initiative aims to build innovative public-pri- vate partnerships that address re- gional challenges through big data analysis. “The award of the South Big


Data Regional Innovation Hub to Georgia Tech and UNC-Chapel Hill provides the right context for collab- oration among 116 stakeholders in academia, industry and the nonprof- it sectors, which will allow us to — for the first time — address large- scale challenges facing many South-


Continued on page 6


No. American PCB Sales Grow


Bannockburn, IL — Sales growth continued in September and the book-to-bill ratio fell back to a more normal but still positive 1.05 accord- ing to IPC — Association Connecting Electronics Industries®. The positive growth was indicated by the Septem- ber findings from IPC’s monthly North American Printed Circuit Board (PCB) Statistical Program. Total North American PCB


shipments increased 3.3 percent in September 2015 compared to Sep- tember 2014. Year-to-date shipment growth finally reached positive terri- tory at 0.3 percent, after struggling to overcome negative sales growth rates seen earlier this year. Com- pared to the previous month, PCB shipments were up 12.1 percent. PCB bookings decreased 2.0


percent compared to September 2014, reducing year-to-date order growth to 5.2 percent. Orders were down 7.4 percent in September com- pared to the previous month. “The North American PCB in-


dustry continues to see modest but Continued on page 8


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