This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
OTHERLEVELS


situations change. Even if some users decided not to accept push messages originally, it’s quite possible they can be lured back. This is especially true among very engaged and


premium users. It’s possible that many of these users initially opted out for push notifications because that’s what they always do with new apps. But once they’ve established a strong usage pattern, you can prompt (and tempt) these users with interstitials and in-app alerts. The beauty of the smartphone is that at the moment of downloading the app, other information – perhaps an email address or account number – will provide data that can be used to connect in other venues. Send an email inviting a user to opt back in. Dangle something of value. Offer to help move beyond an obstacle in the app. Provide updated information that might be more relevant or timely this time around.


Marketers who understand the value of opt-in consumers start with an advantage: They can offer what consumers like and want. They can start conversations. They can use targeted content to turn happy, engaged customers into even happier customers. They can collect more data that will make ongoing “mobile conversations” more intelligent, meaningful, relevant and timely, and studies show that consumers on the receiving end tend to spend more, interact more and spread the good word. Isn’t that a far more positive approach to marketing than basing decisions on fear of the unknown or a concern about turning off a group of consumers who’ve already indicated – by opting out – that they’re not really interested anyway? Why try to impress customers who just aren’t that into your brand at this particular moment in time? The bottom line is simple: the 50% opt-out rate on mobile apps is standard, and it’s a strong message from the user to the marketer and brand: “I’m not interested.” Done well and delivered contextually, push notifications can (and should) be key components of any marketer’s mobile strategy. And they will be necessary in the future. According to Forrester’s “State of Mobile Technology for Marketers 2014” report, predictions indicate that push notifications eventually will move beyond smartphones to mobile-enabled TVs, cars, game consoles, wearables, and other devices and


platforms. As they expand, marketers will need to remain focused on the personal nature – and proximity – of the smartphone and mobile device itself. And once marketers become better at marketing to the 20% of lucrative, revenue-producing consumers who are already interested and engaged, they can then turn their attention to the possibility of re-engaging with those 80% of consumers who initially opted out or who, at a later date, might be suitable for messaging that brings them back into the funnel.


Conclusion


Marketers have much to gain by pursuing valuable engagement opportunities that result from focusing their mobile messaging efforts on top-tier, high-value, already engaged customers – rather than worrying about the opt-out behaviours of consumers who are not interested. Shifting mobile marketing priorities to the “opt-in” customer base, and crafting content based on their interests and activity levels, creates the framework for mobile campaigns that win with customers by delivering the right message to the right person at the right time. New mind-sets and tactics around opt-in and opt- out behaviours provide the groundwork for mobile marketing that is intelligent, informed, executed well and provides tangible results, including more engagement, more revenue, more loyalty and higher customer satisfaction. This shift in mind-set better aligns today’s mobile


marketers with today’s mobile-empowered consumers, creating opportunities in which both can benefit from mutual interactions and informed communications through the customer’s journey. This “smaller but deeper” approach also creates a competitive advantage for marketers who truly understand the nuances, audiences and needs of mobile messaging landscape.


About OtherLevels OtherLevels enables publishers to engage, retain and monetize their mobile audiences by testing,


optimizing and analysing mobile messages. The OtherLevels platform includes segmentation, targeting and retargeting tools that provide both to-device and on-device messaging analytics. Through real-time optimization, including live A/B testing and time zone-based delivery, marketers and CRM managers can maximize campaign outcomes by linking individual message copy to in-app events. OtherLevels supports in-house, vendor push, beacon and SMS messaging solutions across native app and mobile web platforms. Enterprise-level BI and marketing integration with leading campaign management tools enhance and extend the ability of companies to deliver relevant content. OtherLevels supports global clients at scale, the largest having in excess of 500 million app downloads, across 20+ languages. It is headquartered in San Francisco with offices in London and Brisbane, Australia. Visit www.otherlevels.com for more information.


92 SEPTEMBER 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102