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Next Month’s Focus PCB and Test Send News Releases for SMTAI Product Preview VOLUME 30 - NUMBER 8 NEPCON


South China Product Preview


THE GLOBAL HI-TECH ELECTRONICS PUBLICATION August, 2015


Storing Solar Energy for Rainy Days


Albuquerque, NM — Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are working to lower the cost of solar en- ergy systems and improve efficien- cies in a big way, all due to a system of small particles.


Exhibiting in the German Pavilion, IPTE shows off its EasyRouter and Easy Test Handler at NEPCON South China. Product Preview starts on ...


Page 60 New Lean


Methodology at Saline


Saline Lectronics recently completed the second stage of lean methodology implemen- tation, which required acqui- sition of several pieces of au- tomated assembly equipment for this "do" phase.


Page 20


This Month's Focus: Production


and Packaging


Gaining a better understand- ing of no-clean residues, un- derstanding how much clean- liness is required; minimizing downtime during production changeover; testing to achieve zero defects; reflow soldering with and without a vacuum.


Page 52


Technologists John Kelton and Daniel Ray perform inspection of the Falling Particle Receiver during a cloud delay atop the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. (Photo by Randy Montoya).


Ultrasonic Bonding on Lifesaving Mission


West Chester, PA — The same ul- trasonic bonding technology that is used in electronics assembly has come to the aid of our armed forces and emergency responders by en- suring that anchor points for straps on body armor are totally reliable and in compliance with Federal standards. This means compliance with National Institute of Justice


(NIJ) wet-conditioning standards (NIJ-0101.06) requiring body armor to be waterproof, even after submer- sion for 30 minutes. According to this standard, “All


calibration procedures and values will be traceable to NIST require- ments. 5.6 Wet Conditioning 5.6.1 Environmental Condition Body ar- mor undergoing P-BFS performance testing will be tested in a wet condi- tion. This condition will be produced by exposing the armor panel under test to a specified flow and distribu- tion of water prior to beginning the ballistic testing (sec. 5.6.2).” This is a tough standard for manufacturers to meet and how they get there involves total reliance on ultrasonic technolo- gy from Sono bond.


Continued on page 6 Engineers have lifted Sandia’s


continuously recirculating falling par- ticle receiver to the top of the tower at the National Solar Thermal Test Fa- cility, marking the start of first-of-its- kind testing that will continue


through the rest of 2015. The Sandia- developed falling particle receiver works by dropping sand-like ceramic particles through a beam of concen- trated sunlight, capturing and storing the heated particles in an insulated tank. The technology can capture and store heat at high temperatures with- out breaking down, unlike conven- tional molten salt systems. Conventional central receiver


technologies are limited to tempera- tures close to 600°C (1112 degrees Fahrenheit), while operating tempera- tures for the falling particle receiver could exceed 1,000°C. Higher temper- atures mean more available energy and cheaper storage costs because less material is needed to transfer heat.


Cost-Competitive Storage Sandia engineer Cliff Ho, the


project’s principal investigator, said the goal of the testing is to develop a prototype, cost-competitive falling particle receiver that demonstrates the potential for thermal efficiency greater than 90 percent, while achieving particle temperatures of at


Continued on page 8


Results Are Mixed for PCB Book-to-Bill


Bannockburn, IL — IPC® Association


Connecting Electronics Industries has released the May findings from its monthly North American Printed Circuit Board (PCB) Statistical Pro- gram. Sales were down slightly but orders were up. The book-to-bill ratio held steady at 1.02. Total North American PCB


shipments decreased 4.2 percent in May 2015 from May 2014, and year- to-date shipment growth declined to –1.8 percent. Compared to the previ- ous month, PCB shipments were down 3.5 percent. PCB bookings increased by 10.4


percent compared to May 2014, re- turning the year-to-date order growth rate to positive territory at 1.3 percent. Orders increased 0.9 percent in May compared to the pre- vious month. North American PCB sales con-


Continued on page 8


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