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Pantone 289 BOARD MEMBERS ® Jason Turner


position: Athlete Representative (Pistol)


years served: 2


Notable: Three-time Olympian and 2008 Olympic bronze medal- ist in Air Pistol…Has been a top international pistol shooter for 18 years…2013 National Champion (Air & Free)…More than 15 Na- tional Championship medals.


Greatest Olympic moment: Watching my fi rst roommate, Josh Laka- tos, win an Olympic Medal in 1996. We formed a close bond over the years we were roommates, but having him win an Olympic medal a few months after I arrived made the dream of winning an Olympic medal seem attainable. I still have a USA Today article from his win that I pull out from time to time to look at, to help motivate and push me towards another medal!


Why I serve: It is a great way for me to help the athletes in my sport while looking out for the future of the sport and being involved in selection procedures. I hope that in some way I help move our sport in a positive direction for the future.


Upcoming USA Shooting Events


March 13-14


19-29 24-29


April 7-16


8-16


NCAA Rifl e Championships, Fairbanks, Alaska


ISSF WORLD CUP (SHOTGUN), Al Ain, UAE ACUI Nationals, San Antonio, Texas


29-April 3 R/P Spring Selection Fort Benning, Ga.


Shotgun Spring Selection Fort Benning, Ga.


Pantone 289 - CMYK C-100 M-60 Y-0 K-56


Pantone 186


Pantone 186 - CMYK C-0 M-100 Y-81 K-4


Athlete Endowment Fund Reaches Initial Investment Goal


Fund


The Athlete Endowment reached


its initial


investment goal of $1.5 million and can now be- gin awarding athletes with grants to cover training and competition expenses. Recognizing the need for USA Shooting to build its own base of fi nancial sup- port, Col. Dennis Behrens began the Athlete Endow- ment Fund in 2005. What began as a small inner-circle of Behrens’ hunting bud- dies, has now blossomed into a very loyal and dedicat- ed group. The Bunker Club was born at a time when USAS was in a tight fi nancial position, but in immediate need to replace the bunker trap machines at the Inter- national Shotgun Range in Colorado Springs. The ma- chines cost $200,000, and the Bunker Club members came together to success- fully help complete the proj- ect.


With that success, Bun-


ker Club members then decided to make a long- term commitment to USA Shooting athletes.


The


18-May 6 NJOSC (R/P) Colorado Springs, Colo. 24-May 4 ISSF WORLD CUP (SHOTGUN) Larnaca, Cyprus


May 11-19


21-25


ISSF WORLD CUP USA (RIFLE/PISTOL) Fort Benning, Ga.


26-June 2 ISSF WORLD CUP (ALL DISCIPLINES) Munich, Germany


28 USA Shooting News | March 2015


SCTP JO Development Camp Colorado Springs, Colo.


Some members of USA Shooting’s Bunker Club recently partici- pated in a driven partridge hunt.


ISSF WORLD CUP (RIFLE/PISTOL) Changwon, Korea


name, which came from replacing the bunker trap machines, stuck, but the mission changed to funding an endowment for all USAS shooting disciplines and now includes 82 members. Membership in the Bunker Club requires a minimum donation of $3,000 per person with 100 percent of donations going into the En- dowment.


“The goal is to build a


strong foundation of USA Shooting athletes by assist- ing aspiring and talented competitive shooters and to help them develop their shooting skills in order to be- come high-level competitors and Olympians,” acknowl- edged Behrens. With 100 percent of the money going directly


to


USA Shooting athletes, the Athlete Endowment Fund is unlike any other program available within USA Shoot- ing. For more information and/or


to donate, please


visit www.usashooting.org/ endowment


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