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WATE DIA & REI


TRAINING WHEELS


Between 2004 and 2012, 97 workers in the waste industry were killed and 3,722 suffered major injuries. HSE says it is one of the most dangerous professions. Jacqueline O’Donovan, Managing Director at O’Donovan Waste Disposal, discusses why investment in training is essential to improve the industry’s H&S statistics.


The nature of the waste management business means that although our primary activity is waste management and recycling, a large element inevitably involves transport and logistics. Each year, the UK generates more than 77 million tonnes of construction waste. This equates to almost 4 million HGV waste movements on the UK’s roads in one year.


O’Donovan operates a fleet of 75 vehicles and 75% of our workforce is made up of drivers. Investing in training is crucial to ensure that H&S risk is minimised. Safety of all workers is paramount, including other road users. In the last year alone nine cyclists were killed on London’s roads as a result of a collision with an HGV. Ongoing and in-depth training is crucial for keeping safety a priority.


As a company we invest to ensure all our drivers achieve NVQs in


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HGV driving as well as in waste management. Our commitment to driver training has seen O’Donovan work closely with a number of industry and government stakeholders on projects, which have included the development of role profiles and the industry standard for construction logistics: Managing Work Related Road Risk (WRRR).


“WASTE OPERATORS HAVE A SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TO ENSURE THAT THEIR FLEETS OPERATE TO THE HIGHEST SAFETY STANDARDS.”


The company has also become an approved JAUPT CPC training centre to help improve safety and standards in logistics. We designed a bespoke driver CPC course that is specifically aimed at dealing with the issues


faced by those working in the waste industry. The content is based on the experiences of our own industry professionals, staff and drivers.


As well as training, companies need to invest in providing drivers with the best possible vehicles and safety equipment. This year, O’Donovan has spent in excess of £5,000 per vehicle on safety enhancements and is investing a further £80,000 over a three-year period on bespoke telematics equipment. This enables driver behaviour and driving patterns to be monitored in real-time and potential training requirements to be recognised at an early stage.


Importantly, as well as increasing the knowledge of the drivers, the telematics will also contribute to reducing the risk of accidents and improve road safety. By analysing data on individuals’ driving style,


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