This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Whether it’s a phone to keep in touch with relatives, a tablet for students’ homework or the laptop on which we stream movies, these devices all have become integral to our daily routine. At work, we rely on electricity to power our computers, phones,


depend on the refrigerator to keep our food fresh, air conditioning and heating to keep us comfortable and, of course, lights on a daily basis. We also depend on electricity to re-charge our electronics.


lights and productivity. Without this consistent, reliable and aff ordable power source, businesses would relocate, jobs would be lost and prices of goods and services would increase. T at’s why Harmon Electric Association is concerned about the


are owned by our member-consumers. When we look at our power options, we are not driven to make a profi t. We strive to provide the most aff ordable and reliable electricity possible to our members. Owning our own, independent plants has allowed cooperatives


to keep costs aff ordable. For co-ops, “energy independence” in part means independence from expensive, profi t-driven power. However,


dependent supply of aff ordable electric power. Electric cooperatives, like Harmon Electric are small businesses. We’re not large utilities with several diff erent power plants operating with a variety of fuel sources. We built power plants when it made sense for our members. But the way the new rules are written, we might have to close our plant and lose our independence. T e EPA has draſt ed a regulation that adversely and


from new power plants, the agency received more than fi ve hundred thousand emails opposing the regulation! Today we ask you once again, please join us. Visit www.Action.coop again and tell the EPA you cannot aff ord these new regulations. Your voice was heard last time. T e EPA took note of electric


cooperatives, and our collective voice showed that co-op consumers were engaged. T at’s why we’re asking you to take action again. T e EPA needs to understand the impact that these regulations have on


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


When the EPA draſt ed regulations limiting greenhouse gases these new regulations could endanger this in-


Please join us in taking action! Every day we rely on electricity. We


the people at the end of the power lines. Electric cooperative members are uniquely situated to help the EPA understand that these regulations will cost Americans more money. T ese regulations also will cost Americans jobs. T ese


regulations simply will not work for rural Americans. Please, also ask your friends and neighbors to join us. Ask them


to visit www.Action.coop and tell the EPA co-op consumers cannot aff ord regulation. We can balance environmental needs with aff ordability and reliability. America needs a healthy economy. America needs jobs. America


needs manufacturing. And aff ordable, reliable electricity is the linchpin to these vital assets.


latest proposed regulations on existing power plants from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). T is round of rules impacts the power plants on which we rely every day. Cooperatives are diff erent from other electric utilities. We


When Weather Is Hot ...


Cook Less, Cook Quicker Cooking and baking during the summer can heat up your house, compete with the air conditioning and make everyone uncomfortable. Cooking less, then, can save you energy and keep you cooler.


Some tips for the quick cook:


Even if it’s hot outdoors, you won’t add heat to the inside of your home. * When a cooler day or evening rolls in, take the opportunity


disproportionately aff ects electric cooperatives. T at’s why we are telling the EPA that this regulation simply does not work for us.


to cook. Prepare two or three meals at once and freeze them, so all you’ll have to do is thaw and heat them in the microwave next time it’s too hot to cook. * Enjoy cold meals and snacks that need no cooking, like vegetable salads; fruit, cheese and bread; hummus or guacamole and chips or celery; sandwiches; cold soups; and smoothies. * If you must cook, use the microwave oven or a covered pan on the stovetop. Either one pushes less heat into the kitchen than a hot oven. * Choose foods that cook quickly, like fi sh and vegetables. Chopping veggies into small, evenly sized pieces speeds cooking time. * Don’t use the microwave or oven to defrost frozen food. Instead, place the frozen item in the refrigerator and let it thaw out overnight before cooking it the next day. * Preparing food in an electric skillet, wok or crock pot adds less heat to the air than cooking on the stove. 401600


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES - Lisa Richard, Editor The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter ..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves ....................................................................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman ...............................................................................................District 3 Bob Allen .......................................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence ....................................................................................................District 6 J R Conley .....................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings Held Fourth Thursday of Each Month


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch service- men. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call our offi ce at 688-3342. Any other exchange


area call toll free, 1-800-643-7769.


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


* Prepare your main course outdoors on the barbecue grill.


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