This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
■ commentary An EPA Primer P


robably all of us have heard of the Environmental


What is the EPA and why their actions matter to you. CO2,


Protection Agency (EPA). But what is the EPA?


Created by executive order by President Richard Nixon, the EPA is the federal agency created to enforce regulations based on laws passed by Congress for the protection of human health and environment.


are rising sea levels and change in the eco-system causing more drought, worsening smog, and the increased risk of getting a tick.


BYTERRY MATLOCK cHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


The EPA suggests that driving cars, using electricity and throwing away your garbage all contribute to greenhouse gas emissions. So what can you do to help?


According to information published by the EPA


Choctaw Electric, its membership and all electric co-ops face some challenging times ahead, mainly due to the “Clean Power Plan.” The Clean Power Plan proposes to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants,


it’s as simple as powering down electronics, changing a light bulb or using less water. Here’s the list:


1. Change 5 light bulbs to energy efficient bulbs.


2. Look for Energy Star products to put in your home.


“Today, Choctaw Electric, its membership and all co-ops face some challenging times ahead, mainly the “Clean Power Plan.”


which the EPA claims is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. The government says greenhouse gas emissions have increased by 11 percent since 1990.


The plan, according to the EPA, would create jobs as they close down some 100 of the 600 coal-fired generation plants across the United States. The EPA says health risks associated with


3. Change air filters and replace old heating and cooling units with Energy Star units.


4. Seal and insulate your home. 5. Recycle and reuse. 6. Use water efficiently.


7. Be green in the yard by composting.


8. Use green power.


9. Estimate your own greenhouse gas emissions footprint.


10. Spread the word.


For more information about EPA regulations and the potential impact on electricity costs, visit www.action.coop.


Good luck!


Choctaw Electric Cooperative BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Mike Bailey, President Bob Hodge, Vice President


Rodney Lovitt , Secretary Treasurer MEMBERS


Bill McCain Henry Baze Bob Holley


Buddy Anderson Joe Briscoe


Larry Johnson MANAGEMENT AND STAFF


Terry Matlock, Chief Executive Officer Susan G. Wall, Executive Assistant Jia Johnson, Director of Public Relations Tonia Allred, Benefits Specialist


Jimmie K. Ainsworth, Director of Finance and Accounting


Jim Malone, Director of Operations Darrell Ward, District Supervisor


HUGO OFFICE PO Box 758 Hwy 93 North


Hugo, Oklahoma 74743


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 326-6486 FAX (580) 326-2492


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm IDABEL OFFICE


2114 SE Washington Idabel, Oklahoma 74745


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 286-7155


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm


ANTLERS OFFICE HC 67 Box 62


Antlers, Oklahoma 74523 (One mile east of Antlers)


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 298-3201


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm On the Web:


www.choctawelectric.coop


24 Hour Outage Hotline 800-780-6486


inside•your•co-op | 3


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