This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Commentary Electric co-ops support local schools A


Chris Meyers General Manager, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


ugust is back to school month. For many fami- lies it’s the be-


ginning of a new routine, getting up and ready for school each day and attend- ing various school functions. Few things are as important as a quality education and


the socialization and healthy development of our children. Dedicated educators, administrators, parents and volunteers spend lots of time and energy in the edu- cation of our youth, and for that we are thankful. It takes money as well. We will forever debate how much is enough but we can all agree that it’s not free—education must be funded.


As members of electric cooperatives, you help fund public schools each time you pay your electric bill. Co-ops are member-owned, non-profi t organi- zations, and therefore pay no state or federal in- come tax. Margins are returned to the membership in the form of capital credits so there is no income to tax. However, that non-profi t status doesn’t ex- empt co-ops from all taxes. By state law, your elec- tric cooperative collects a “gross receipts” tax in lieu of ad valorem and income taxes.


For the period July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014, electric cooperatives collected just over $38 million dollars in gross receipts taxes, 95 percent of which went directly to local school districts. The other 5 percent went to the state’s general fund. Your generation and transmission (G&T) coop- erative collects a 2 percent gross receipts tax on its total sales of energy and transmission service to your local co-op. The local co-op, in turn, collects a 2 percent gross receipts tax on your total monthly electric bill. Altogether, just under 4 percent of statewide electric cooperative gross receipts go to support local school districts. Of course that’s not the only way your local co- operative supports schools. Most co-ops support various school events, award student scholarships, and sponsor programs like FFA and 4-H. As a cooperative member you can be proud of the fact that you are part of a member-owned, lo- cally controlled, and locally managed organization that supports its community and public schools. This school year, make an extra effort to attend school plays, bands, sporting events, and other functions. Give to teachers’ supply closets and help students with their fundraising programs. The more involved we are in supporting our education sys- tem, the better it will be.


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


Chris Meyers, General Manager Jimmy Taylor, President


Kendall Beck, Vice-President Gary McCune, Secretary Scott Copeland, Treasurer


Staff


Sid Sperry, Director of PR & Communications sksperry@oaec.coop


Anna Politano, Managing Editor editor@ok-living.coop


Daniel Yates, Advertising Manager dyates@ok-living.coop


Christy Johnson, Offi ce Manager cjohnson@oaec.coop


Kirbi Mills, Accountant/Offi ce Manager Asst. kmills@oaec.coop


Hayley Leatherwood, Multimedia Specialist hleatherwood@ok-living.coop


Harriet Orleans, Editorial Intern intern@oaec.coop


Alexis Mellons, Advertising Intern adintern@ok-living.coop


Editorial, Advertising and General Offi ces


P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309 Phone (405) 478-1455


Oklahoma Living online: www.ok-living.coop Subscriptions


$3.12 per year for rural electric cooperative members.


Co-ops ‘educate, train & inform’ I


Jimmy Taylor President, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


Cooperative


n nearly every issue of Oklahoma Living maga- zine you will fi nd a refer- ence to one of the ‘Seven Principles.’


These tenets form the foun- dation of every cooperative enterprise around the globe, from principles that define electric cooperatives to those


that enable agricultural or housing cooperatives to function at the will of their member-owners. The 5th Cooperative Principle is about ‘Education, Training and Information,’ and states the following: “Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representa- tives, managers, and employees so that they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public, par- ticularly young people and opinion leaders, about the nature and benefi ts of cooperation.” It is from this principle that electric cooperatives and statewide associations, like the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, fulfi ll their obligation to provide education, training and


4 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


information to member-owners on a regular and timely basis. In many cases, the education and in- formation sharing process begins with your local cooperative newsletter and, additionally, a subscrip- tion to Oklahoma Living magazine. To borrow a phrase: Yes, membership does have its privileges! A key mission of this publication is to educate


and inform you, the member-owners of local elec- tric cooperatives, about signifi cant issues at the state and federal level that could have an impact on your electric bill—a vital component of today’s standard of living.


On Page 17 of this edition is an article explaining


how the latest proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for existing power plants, if implemented, could adversely affect your electric bill. I would encourage you to read this article care- fully, and let your voice be heard by visiting the www.action.coop website link. I believe our magazine strives to provide enter- taining and informative articles about people and places in Oklahoma; but its core purpose is to help educate members about issues potentially affecting their lives and lifestyles. It’s an obligation we gladly fulfi ll.


$6.00 per year for non-members. Cooperative Members: Report change of


address to your local rural electric cooperative. Non-Cooperative Members: Send address


changes to Oklahoma Living, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Oklahoma Living (ISSN 1064-8968),


USPS 407-040, is published monthly for consumer-members of Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, 2325 E. I-44 Service Road,


P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309. Circulation this issue: 316,733


Periodical postage paid at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Association of Electric


Cooperatives is a statewide service organization for the following electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Arkansas Valley, Caddo, Canadian Valley,


Central Rural, Choctaw, Cimarron, Cookson Hills, Cotton, East Central Oklahoma, Harmon, Indian, KAMO Power, Kay, Kiamichi, Kiwash, Lake Region, Northeast Oklahoma, Northfork,


Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ozarks, People’s, Red River Valley, Rural, Southeastern, Southwest


Rural, Tri-County, Verdigris Valley, and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174