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PAGE 2 | AUGUST 2014


Storm recovery efforts required extra help Continued from page one


Eight sister cooperatives in Texas and Oklahoma sent crews to help TCEC. By the third day following the storm, about 75 people from fifteen line crews were working to restore power to members.


Te following cooperatives sent crews:


„ Northfork Electric Cooperative Sayre, Oklahoma


„ Kay Electric Cooperative Blackwell, Oklahoma


„ Cimarron Electric Cooperative Kingfisher, Oklahoma


„ Alfalfa Electric Cooperative Cherokee, Oklahoma


„ Northwestern Electric Cooperative Woodward, Oklahoma


„ Central Rural Electric Cooperative Stillwater, Oklahoma


„ Greenbelt Electric Cooperative Wellington, Texas


„ North Plains Electric Cooperative Perryton, Texas (contractor crew)


“Safely restoring power to the greatest number of people in the shortest time frame possible was our goal during restoration efforts,” Perkins said.


He explained electric utilities generally follow a five-step process after major disasters to achieve this goal.


Step 1: Transmission line and interchange repairs


Step 2: Distribution substation repairs Step 3: Distribution lines feeding towns and cities


Step 4: Tap line repair Step 5: Service line repair


“Some people questioned why they were without power when their neighbor had it,” Perkins said. “Depending on how power is fed to them and where the system is damaged, some individuals experienced an isolated outage for an extended time. Tis is especially true in rural areas where miles of line may deliver power to only one meter.”


TCEC maintains a complex system to deliver power to its members. Te cooperative oversees 5,433 miles of transmission and distribution line with 112,400 poles serving 22,791 meters.


Some members may have purchased backup generators after this storm. Members should notify TCEC when they install a standby generator and it should have a double throw switch to prevent backfeeding. Members using a portable generator that is not hard-wired into their electrical system do not need to notify TCEC or install the throw switch.


Because disaster can strike anytime, members should assemble a survival kit so they’re prepared for power outages or other emergencies. Te American Red Cross has detailed instructions on how to prepare a kit at www.redcross.org.


SERVICE TECHNICIAN ERIC LEISHER WORKS DURING THE JUNE 30 STORM TO RESTORE POWER.


TCEC recommends members with smartphones install two mobile apps to help stay safe and informed during severe weather or widespread power outages.


Te ‘TCEC Mobile’ app includes a map showing current outages as well as the Facebook and Twitter feeds for TCEC.


Te ‘Touchstone Energy Weather Connection’ app is like a weather radio with severe weather alerts for up to five locations as well as custom notifications from TCEC.


Members can like TCEC on Facebook and follow the cooperative on Twitter for regular updates.


Members should visit www.tcec.coop to download mobile apps or find the co-op’s social channels. „


FIFTEEN CREWS WORKED LONG HOURS THROUGH THE INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAY WEEKEND TO RESTORE POWER TO TCEC MEMBERS AFTER THE STORM.


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