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Co-op Business Official Notice of Annual Meeting


Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Electric Cooperative will be held at 7:15 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, at the Lloyd Noble Center, 2900 S. Jenkins, Norman, Okla., to take action upon the following matters:


1. Report as to the number of members present in order to determine the existence of a quorum.


2. Read, or waiver thereof, and vote on notice of meeting, proof of publication, and minutes of previous meetings of members.


3. Read, or waiver thereof, and vote on expenditures and actions of Trustees during the past year. 4. Installation of recently-elected Trustees–Districts 2, 4, and 8.


5. Consider such unfi nished business and new business and other matters that may properly come before the meeting.


All Oklahoma Electric Cooperative members are invited to attend the 4:30 p.m. barbecue meal served prior to the business meeting, during which time various entertainers will perform. Drawings for prizes will take place immediately after the business session. Winners must be present during the drawing to claim their prize.


This notice issued: July 25, 2014. Seven Cooperative Principles VOLUNTARY AND OPEN MEMBERSHIP


Cooperatives are voluntary organizations open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political or religious discrimination.


DEMOCRATIC MEMBER CONTROL


Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. The elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives, members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and cooperatives at other levels are organized in a democratic manner.


MEMBERS’ ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION


Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing the cooperative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.


4 COOPERATION AMONG COOPERATIVES


Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.


CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY


While focusing on member needs, cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies accepted by their members.


AUTONOMY AND INDEPENDENCE


Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy.


EDUCATION, TRAINING AND INFORMATION


Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so that they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public, particularly young people and opinion leaders, about the nature and benefits of cooperation.


www.okcoop.org August 2014


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