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NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC


COOPERATIVE, INC.


Woodward, Oklahoma Operating In


Beaver, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major, Woods and Woodward Counties in Oklahoma


TYSON LITTAU


CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Kenny Knowles, Pres......................... Arnett Ray Smith, Vice-Pres. ........................Taloga John Bruce, Jr., Sec.-Treas. .............. Sharon Marvin Wilkinson ............................ Buffalo Clair Craighead ...........................Woodward Wayne Hall..................................Mooreland Duane Henderson........................Mooreland Lee Huckaby.....................................Selman Gilbert Perkins. .....................................Gate


Jonna Hensley.....................................Editor Michael W. Mitchel........................ Attorney


IN CASE OF TROUBLE CALL: 24 HOUR EMERGENCY 1-877-9NOPOWER 877.966.7693


If no answer call: John Kirkwood........................580.866.3245 Bob Appell ..............................580.273.4088


NOTICE


A copy of NWEC Bylaws will be made available for any member upon request.


Web page: www.nwecok.coop E-mail: nwec@nwecok.coop


NWEC is an equal opportunity provider and em- ployer.


If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Dis- crimination Complaint Form, found online at http:// www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call 866.632.9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax 202.690.7442 or email at program.intake @usda.gov.


August 2014 SUMMER ENERGY EFFICIENCY:


Myth #1: When I’m not home, keeping my air conditioner at a lower temperature throughout the day means it doesn’t have to run harder to cool my home when I return.


FACT: To save energy, set your thermostat to a higher temperature during the day, and lower it when you return home.


Myth #2: Closing vents on my central air conditioning system will boost efficiency.


FACT: Closing vents can cause the compressor to cycle too frequently and the heat pump to overload. You’ll also use more energy.


Myth #3: Time of day doesn’t matter when it comes to running my appliances.


FACT: Time of day does matter when running electrical loads. For example, take advantage of the delay setting and run your dishwasher at night to avoid peak times of use and save energy.


Myth #4: Bigger is always better when it comes to cooling equipment.


FACT: Too often, cooling equipment isn’t sized properly and leads to higher electric bills. A unit that’s too large for your home will not cool evenly and might produce higher humidity indoors.


Woodward County Fair free hot dog feed T


houghts of a county fair bring back memories to many people of fun times—sack races, showing a calf, winning a blue ribbon, visiting with friends and the best tasting hot dogs in the world. Join us this year at the Woodward County Fair on Aug. 23, from noon until 1 p.m., for a free hot dog. Due to construction on the current facili- ties in Woodward, the fair will be held at the Mooreland fair barn.


May 2014 Operating Report 2013


Revenue - Billing......................................................... Cost of Power............................................................... Miles of Lines .............................................................. Members Connected .................................................... Density per Mile .......................................................... Average Member KWH............................................... Average Bill .................................................................


2,465,521 1,642,108 4,936


11,639 2.36


2,334 211.83


KWH Purchased........................................................... 30,048,987 KWH Sold.................................................................... 27,160,346 Income per Mile........................................................... Expense per Mile .........................................................


503 531


2014


2,974,082 2,046,891 4,955


11,799 2.38


2,417 252.06


31,773,354 28,512,443 604 606


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