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GENOMIC CORNER I


Just because an animal does well genomically using one country’s particular conversion formula does not mean that it will do well using a different country’s conversion formula – which are different. Emma Jones discusses in layman’s terms why this is


n the UK we have the Profi table Lifetime Index (PLI) system. Our PLI index has been formulated to work well in the UK dairy farming conditions. To read more about our PLI, see page 60.If when you requested a genomic PLI you also requested your genomic TPI, you may wonder why, for example, the GPLI of your animal is high and the GTPI is average. This is because different countries use different formulas to work out their own indexes.


Finding out other countries indexes is important if you want to market your heifer, and even more important if you want to market your bulls. But it is important to understand the different indexes and their weightings in order to assist in improving your herd to understand each animal’s strengths and weaknesses.


North America has the Total Performance Index (TPI). This caters for cows that suit the American system. 29% of the TPI is Fitness traits, 43% is Production traits and 28% goes to Type. Canada has Lifetime Profi t Index (LPI). Only 15% of the LPI goes to Fitness traits, a hefty 51% is put on Production and 34% on Type.


Germany has the German Total Merit Index (RZG). 40% is put on Fitness, 45% on Production and only 15% for Type. Other countries have their own indexes but these would be the main four if you want to sell bulls into AI or if you want to buy any heifers overseas.


In America (GTPI) and Canada (GLPI) the genomic index of a calf is calculated by using the actual animal’s genotype together with parent/family information. This is then combined to create a GTPI/GLPI.


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